Life of Thomas Jefferson: With Selections from the Most Valuable Portions of His Voluminous and Unrivalled Private Correspondence. By B. L. Rayner

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Lilly, Wait, Colman, & Holden, 1834 - 431 pages
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Contents

I
21
II
35
III
53
IV
72
V
108
VI
134
VII
157
VIII
195
IX
214
X
268
XI
289
XII
294
XIII
303
XIV
376

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Page 231 - What signify a few lives lost in a century or two ? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.
Page 37 - And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the gift of God?
Page 185 - The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other.
Page 322 - There is on the globe one single spot, the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy. It is New Orleans, through which the produce of three-eighths of our territory must pass to market, and from its fertility it will ere long yield more than half of our whole produce, and contain more than half of our inhabitants.
Page 139 - ... yet we are free to declare, and do declare, that the rights hereby asserted are of the natural rights of mankind, and that if any act shall be hereafter passed to repeal the present or to narrow its operation, such act will be an infringement of natural right.
Page 375 - Some men look at constitutions with sanctimonious reverence, and deem them, like the ark of the covenant, too sacred to be touched. They ascribe to the men of the preceding age a wisdom more than human, and suppose what they did to be beyond amendment.
Page 111 - Those who labor in the earth are the chosen people of God, (if ever he had a chosen people,) whose breasts He has made his peculiar deposit for substantial and genuine virtue. It is the focus in which He keeps alive that sacred fire, which, otherwise, might escape from the face of the earth. Corruption of morals, in the mass of cultivators, is a phenomenon, of which no age nor nation has furnished an example.
Page 138 - Almighty power to do ; that the impious presumption of legislators and rulers, civil as well as ecclesiastical, who being themselves but fallible and uninspired men, have assumed dominion over the faith of others...
Page 376 - But I know also, that laws and institutions must go hand in hand with the progress of the human mind.
Page 91 - The pusillanimous idea that we had friends in England worth keeping terms with, still haunted the minds of many. For this reason, those passages which conveyed censures on the people of England were struck out, lest they should give them offence.

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