Shaking the Heavens and Splitting the Earth: Chinese Air Force Employment Concepts in the 21st Century

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Rand Corporation, 2011 - History - 308 pages
Less than a decade ago, China's air force was an antiquated service equipped almost exclusively with weapons based on 1950s-era Soviet designs and operated by personnel with questionable training according to outdated employment concepts. Today, the People's Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) appears to be on its way to becoming a modern, highly capable air force for the 21st century. This monograph analyzes publications of the Chinese military, previously published Western analyses of China's air force, and information available in published sources about current and future capabilities of the PLAAF. It describes the concepts for employing forces that the PLAAF is likely to implement in the future, analyzes how those concepts might be realized in a conflict over Taiwan, assesses the implications of China implementing these concepts, and provides recommendations about actions that should be taken in response.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER ONE Introduction
1
CHAPTER TWO The Organization of Chinas Air and Missile Forces
13
CHAPTER THREE The Evolution of Chinese Air Force Doctrine
33
CHAPTER FOUR Chinese Concepts for the Employment of Air Forces
47
CHAPTER FIVE Air Offensive Campaigns
85
CHAPTER SIX Air Defense Campaigns
117
CHAPTER SEVEN Air Blockade Campaigns
145
CHAPTER EIGHT Airborne Campaigns
165
CHAPTER NINE The Role of Other Services in Air Force Campaigns
179
CHAPTER TEN Possible PLAAF Operational Concepts Capabilities and Tactics in a Taiwan Strait Conflict
187
CHAPTER ELEVEN Conclusions and Implications
225
Bibliography
247
Index
257
Back Cover
275
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About the author (2011)

Roger Cliff (Ph.D., International Relations, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University) is an Associate Political Scientist, RAND, Washington DC. Areas of research include U.S. policy toward China, Chinese arms transfers, technological progress in China, and Chinese military technology.

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