Theology of Culture

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Oxford University Press, 1959 - History - 213 pages
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"Theology of Culture" draws together fifteen of Dr. Tillich's finest essays, in which a diversity of contemporary attitudes and problems is brought within the wide scope of his philosophy. His classic essay, "The Two Types of Philosophy of Religion, " is included here as a focal arguement for closing "the fateful gap between religion and culture, thus reconciling concerns which are not strange to each other." Dr. Tillich consequently shows "the religious dimension in many special spheres of man's cultural activity "by discussing religion in relation to art, Existentialism, psychoanalysis, science, and education. He also argues against spiritual and intellectual provincialism by comparing the cultures of Europe and Americal, America and Russia, and the philosophies of Protestantism and Judaism. To those already familiar with Dr.Tillich's writings, this book makes available a selection of his previously scattered esays. For those who are reading his book for the first time, this book brings together the grand motifs of the thought of a great theologian and philosopher.
 

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Contents

Religion as a Dimension in Mans Spiritual Life
3
The Two Types of Philosophy of Religion
10
in The Struggle Between Time and Space
37
The Nature of Religious Language
53
Protestantism and Artistic Style
68
Its Historical Meaning
76
viu The Theological Significance of Existentialism
112
A Discussion withEinstein
127
Theonmous Ethics i3 3
146
America and Russia
188
A Question
201
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About the author (1959)

Paul Johannes Tillich was born into a German Lutheran pastor's family in that part of Germany that is now Poland. He attended several universities, earning the doctorate in philosophy in 1910, then taught at several more from 1919 to 1933. Removed from his professorate at Frankfurt by the Nazi government, he emigrated to the United States, with the encouragement of Reinhold Niebuhr, and taught at Union Theological Seminary in New York (1933--55), Harvard University (1955--62), and the University of Chicago (1962--65). The fullest biography, including some fairly lurid material of a psychosexual nature, can be found in the appreciative work by Wilhelm and Marion Pauck. The student who wants to encounter Tillich at his most succinct might turn to The Courage To Be (1952) or The Theology of Paul Tillich (1982). He is sometimes classified as Neo-orthodox, but that label does not fit him as well as it does Karl Barth, who had small regard for Tillich's "theology of correlation," where responding to the world's questions is seen as the proper way of practicing theology.

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