The Journal of Immunology, Volume 5

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Williams & Wilkins Company, 1920 - Immunity
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Page 431 - From the Division of Laboratories and Research, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York Received for publication July
Page 527 - A favorite interpretation of the Wassermann reaction, which seems to harmonize with the known facts, is that there is a precipitation of serum globulin by the lipoidal colloids of the antigen, and adsorption of the complement by this precipitate.
Page 272 - During the active progress of an infectious disease, the body cells supply the ferment, the infecting organism constitutes the substrate, the process is essentially destructive, the protein poison is set free, the symptoms of disease appear and life is placed in jeopardy.
Page 131 - KOLMER, JA, MATSUNAMI, T., AND HARKINS, MJ The relation of the bronchisepticin skin reaction to immunity in canine distemper including the bactericidal action of dog serum for B.
Page 419 - PROPERTIES OF GLOBIN, WITH A NOTE ON THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE PROPERTIES OF SERUM AND TISSUE PROTEINS, AS EXEMPLIFIED BY THE ABSENCE OF ANTIBODY FROM THE GLOBIN OF AN IMMUNISED ANIMAL
Page 508 - In acute and early subacute infections it is on a par with the Wassermann test in the initial lesion stage prior to development of the secondary. A non-gonorrhoeic does not give a positive complement fixation test.
Page 430 - NOTE ON THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE PROPERTIES OF SERUM AND TISSUE PROTEINS, AS EXEMPLIFIED BY THE ABSENCE OF ANTIBODY FROM THE GLOBIN OF AN IMMUNISED ANIMAL
Page 366 - a condition of specific or particular reactivity, with characteristic symptoms, to the administration of or contact with any substance in a quantity which to most of the individuals of the same species is innocuous.
Page 366 - characteristic symptoms" are generally different in the different animal species for the same group of substances. 2. They are uniform in any one species for various substances. 3. Where the exciting agent possesses a normal physiological action; for example, the drugs, the symptoms of this action are, with few exceptions, different from those of hypersensitiveness to that agent.
Page 37 - The inhibition is due to antibodies that arise during the immunization or during the natural disease., These antibodies are not identical with the agglutinins, the bacteriolysins or the precipitins. They must be considered as specific antibodies, which combine with dissolved antigen to form molecular complexes, that have a marked tendency to absorb complement and to withdraw it from the bactericidal antibodies.

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