If Not Now, When?

Front Cover
Penguin, 1995 - Fiction - 349 pages
7 Reviews
In the final days of World War II, a courageous band of Jewish partisans makes its way from Russia to Italy, moving toward the ultimate goal of Palestine. Based on a true story, If Not Now, When? chronicles their adventures as they wage a personal war of revenge against the Nazis: blowing up trains, rescuing the last victims of concentration camps, scoring victories in the face of unspeakable devastation. Primo Levi captures the landscape and the people of Eastern Europe in vivid detail, depicting as well the terrible bleakness of war-ridden Europe. But finally, what he gives us is a tribute to the strength and ingenuity of the human spirit.

"One of the most important and gifted writers of our time" —Italo Calvino

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - suesbooks - LibraryThing

I did not care for this tale of the partisans as much as I did the other P:rimo Levi works I have read. I found this very jounalistic, and I did learn details of the partisans' lives, but I was not able to connect with or care about individual characters. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jmoncton - LibraryThing

Well written story about a group of Jews who band together to continue fighting the war as an outlaw group of partisans as they make their way towards Italy. Interesting that much of the content was so devasatating, yet told in such a dispassionate way. Still had a large impact. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
3
II
19
III
45
IV
72
V
99
VI
123
VII
154
VIII
180
IX
211
X
235
XI
264
XII
287
XIII
314
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About the author (1995)

Primo Levi (1919-1987), an Italian Jew, did not come to the wide attention of the English-reading audience until the last years of his life. A survivor of the Holocaust and imprisonment in Auschwitz, Levi is considered to be one of the century's most compelling voices, and The Periodic Table is his most famous book. Levi is also the author of Moments of Reprieve.

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