Biographia Dramatica: Names of the dramas: M-Z. Latin plays by English authors. Oratorios. Appendix to v.2 and 3. Additions and corrections to v.2 and 3 (Google eBook)

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1812 - Dramatists, English
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Page 78 - Hence, all you vain delights, As short as are the nights, Wherein you spend your folly : There's nought in this life sweet If man were wise to see't, But only melancholy, O sweetest Melancholy...
Page 78 - Fountain heads and pathless groves, Places which pale passion loves ! Moonlight walks, when all the fowls Are warmly housed save bats and owls ! A midnight bell, a parting groan ! These are the sounds we feed upon ; Then stretch our bones in a still gloomy valley ; Nothing's so dainty sweet as lovely melancholy.
Page 56 - And terror on my aching sight; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a dullness to my trembling heart. Give me thy hand, and let me hear thy voice; Nay, quickly speak to me, and let me hear Thy voice — my own affrights me with its echoes.
Page 283 - And by ill-imitating would excel,) Might hence presume the whole Creation's day To change in scenes, and show it in a play.
Page 106 - ... yet we cannot but pity him when at last we find him perplexed in the extreme.
Page 150 - Yes: they will give enlightened freedom to our minds, who are themselves the slaves of passion, avarice, and pride. They offer us their protection. Yes, such protection as vultures give to lambs — covering and devouring them ! They call on us to barter all of good we have inherited and proved, for the desperate chance of something better which they promise. Be our plain answer this : The throne we honour is the people's choice; the laws we reverence are our brave fathers...
Page 25 - In all these parts the language is poetical, and the sentiments are generous ; but there is something wanting to allure attention. The dispute between the Lady and Comus is the most animated and affecting scene of the drama, and wants nothing but a brisker reciprocation of objections and replies to invite attention and detain it.
Page 150 - My brave associates — partners of my toil, my feelings, and my fame ! — can Rolla's words add vigour to the virtuous energies which inspire your hearts ? No ! — You have judged as I have, the foulness of the crafty plea by which these bold invaders would delude you — Your generous spirit has compared as mine has, the motives which, in a war like this, can animate their minds, and ours.
Page 150 - They boast they come but to improve our state, enlarge our thoughts, and free us from the yoke of error ! Yes: they will give enlightened freedom to our minds, who are themselves the slaves of passion, avarice, and pride. They offer us their protection. Yes, such protection as vultures give to lambs — covering and devouring them...
Page 150 - Adventurer whom they fear - and obey a power which they hate - WE serve a Monarch whom we love - a God whom we adore. - Whene'er they move in anger, desolation tracks their progress! - Where'er they pause in amity, affliction mourns their friendship! - They boast they come but to improve our state, enlarge our thoughts, and free us from the yoke of error! Yes - THEY will give enlightened freedom to our minds, who are themselves the slaves of passion, avarice, and pride - They offer us their protection...