Guerrilla Warfare in the Irish War of Independence, 1919–1921

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McFarland, Mar 8, 2011 - History - 300 pages
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Tracing the development of the Irish Republican Army following Ireland’s Declaration of Independence, this book focuses on the recruitment, training, and arming of Ireland’s military volunteers and the Army’s subsequent guerrilla campaign against British rule. Beginning with a brief account of the failed Easter Rising, it continues through the resulting military and political reorganizations, the campaign’s various battles, and the eventual truce agreements and signing of the Anglo-Irish Treaty. Other topics include the significance of Irish intelligence and British counter-intelligence efforts; urban warfare and the fight for Dublin; and the role of female soldiers, suffragists, and other women in waging the IRA’s campaign.
 

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Just looking on the Google books, there is at least one inaccuracy. MacEoin, despite the statements at his trial by those who surrendered at Clonfin was actually sentenced to death. There is evidence of his letters to Brigid Lyons and others where he had his 'final' messages smuggled out to his Brigade. His release came about because Michael Collins et al insisted that it became a condition of the truce with Britain. 

Contents

Preface
1
Introduction
3
1 The Easter Rising 1916
11
2 Political Reorganization
31
3 Military Reorganization
38
4 Passive Resistance
66
5 The Intelligence War
73
6 Urban Warfare
97
The Second Year of the War
132
The Last Year of the War
184
12 Between Truce and Treaty
250
13 Conclusion
265
Appendix I
273
Appendix II
275
Appendix III
278
Chapter Notes
279

7 The Splendid Women
109
8 Guerrilla Warfare
116
The War Begins
125
Bibliography
283
Index
285
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Joseph McKenna is a former senior assistant librarian in the Central Library, Birmingham, England. He has an M.A. in local history, and formerly sat on the Roman Catholic Archdiocesan Historical Commission, and Birmingham City Council’s Conservation Areas Advisory Committee.

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