Women in 1900: Gateway to the Political Economy of the 20th Century

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Temple University Press, Jun 4, 2010 - Business & Economics - 272 pages
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This interdisciplinary volume provides a historical and international framework for understanding the changing role of women in the political economy of Latin America and the Caribbean. The contributors challenge the traditional policies, goals, and effects of development, and examine such topics as colonialism and women's subordination; the links to economic, social, and political trends in North America; the gendered division of paid and unpaid work; differing economic structures, cultural and class patterns; women's organized resistance; and the relationship of gender to class, race, and ethnicity/nationality.
 

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Contents

Understanding the Past to Interpret the Present
1
The Case of the Unemployed Housewife
22
Determining Womens Employment
55
The Links Between Occupational Sex and Race Segregation
86
Women and Domestic Work
128
Strategies for an Era Without Government Support
158
Geography as a Context for Work
190
8 Epilogue
213
Supplementary Tables
217
Notes
237
References
239
Index
251
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About the author (2010)

Christine E. Bose, Professor of Sociology and Women's Studies, University at Albany, SUNY, is author or editor of five other books, including Women in the Latin American Development Process (Temple). She is the current editor of Gender & Society.

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