Transformative Entrepreneurs: How Walt Disney, Steve Jobs, Muhammad Yunus, and Other Innovators Succeeded

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Macmillan, Jan 17, 2012 - Business & Economics - 224 pages
Entrepreneurs are the key to any successful new business. But having a good idea is not enough . . . too many good ideas fail at the execution level. Meticulously researched with fresh insights into the entrepreneurial process, Transformative Entrepreneurs provides a fascinating perspective on those enterprises and entrepreneurs that have changed the landscape of society, and highlights the challenges and excitement of launching new innovative businesses. Jeff Harris brings in-depth perceptions from his nearly thirty years of venture capital experience to provide a thorough understanding of the transformative ideas and leadership abilities that separate the winners and losers. From Fred Smith's Federal Express to Hugh Hefner's Playboy, and Ted Turner's CNN to Herb Kelleher's Southwest Airlines, the pioneering business models and execution skills of the founders come to life providing an inspirational lens for those chasing the dream.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Changing the Landscape
13
2 Creative Construction
29
3 True Grit
43
4 New Horses for Old Courses
61
5 NextMover Advantage
75
6 Failure Is an Option
89
7 Bad Boys
103
10 Venturesome Capital
141
11 Noble Endeavors
153
12 Entrepreneurial Government
163
13 Government Matters
171
14 Innovate or Die
179
Acknowledgments
187
Notes
189
Selected Bibliography
195

8 Enterprising Enterprises
121
9 The Epitome of Innovation
131

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About the author (2012)

 Jeffrey Harris spent nearly thirty years in the venture capital and private equity business at Warburg Pincus, in New York City where he financed numerous new ventures and worked alongside entrepreneurs in many countries around the world to help them build their businesses in the information technology, telecommunications, energy, industrial, and retailing industries. He is past chairman of the National Venture Capital Association and has served on numerous private and public company boards of directors in the U.S. and Europe. He is active as a trustee at several leading healthcare and educational organizations, and is an Adjunct Professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business where he teaches courses on venture capital and innovation.

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