Pike's system of arithmetick[!] abridged ...: to which are added appropriate questions, for the examination of scholars, and a short system of book-keeping (Google eBook)

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H. Hill, 1830 - Arithmetic - 228 pages
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Page 2 - District, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit : " THE CHILD'S BOTANY," In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, " An act for the encouragement of learning by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned...
Page 105 - ... from the right hand of the quotient, point off so many places for decimals, as the decimal places in the dividend exceed those in the divisor.
Page 172 - Fellowship with time, is when the stocks of partners are continued unequal times. RULE. Multiply each man's stock by the time it was continued in trade. Then, As the whole sum of the products is to the whole gain or loss, so is each man's particular product to his particular share of the loss or gain.
Page 221 - As I was going to St. Ives, I met a man with seven wives, Every wife had seven sacks, Every sack had seven cats, Every cat had seven kits — Kits, cats, sacks, and wives, How many were going to St. Ives?
Page 48 - Place the numbers so that those of the same denomination may stand directly under each other. 2. Add the first column or denomination together, as in whole numbers ; then divide the sum by as many of the samo denomination as make one of the next greater...
Page 180 - RULE.—Multiply each payment by the time at which it is due; then divide the sum of the products by the sum of the payments, and the quotient will be the equated time.* • , EXAMPLES.
Page 109 - ... if the shillings be odd ; and the third place by 1 "when the farthings exceed 12, and by 2 when they exceed 36.
Page 89 - Multiply each numerator into all the denominators except its own, for a new numerator : and all the denominators into each other continually for a common denominator; this written under the several new numerators will give the fractions required.
Page 141 - A cord of wood is a pile 8 feet long, 4 feet wide, and 4 feet high.
Page 90 - Reduce the given fraction to such a compound one, as will express the value of the given fraction, by comparing it with all the denominations between it and that denomination you would reduce it to ; lastly, reduce this compound fraction to a single one, by Case V.

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