The Revolutions of Spain, from 1808 to the End of 1836: With Biographical Sketches of the Most Distinguished Personages, and a Narrative of the War in the Peninsula Down to the Present Time, from the Most Authentic Sources, Volume 2

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R. Bentley, 1837 - Peninsular War, 1807-1814
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Page 305 - The position was carried at the point of the bayonet, and the enemy driven behind his ramparts.
Page 334 - ... the murderous weapons which had been before employed. Another master, endeavouring to escape, was fired upon by an urbano ; and as the shot missed, he was bayoneted in the back. Three in disguise escaped into the streets, hoping by this means to save their lives ; but they were murdered by the mob, to whom regular communications were made of what was passing inside the building. On every side were heard the groans of the dying, the screams of those who were vainly endeavouring to escape, the...
Page 88 - Roncesvalles, issued a proclamation to the inhabitants and an address to the soldiers. In the former, after begging those whom he addressed not to be discouraged by the misfortune of Santos Ladron, he added, " No vengeance ! oblivion of the past, and a religious observance of the decree of amnesty ! Let order, union, and valour be your motto, and triumph is certain.
Page 280 - Here, count,' said the Carlist leader, ' take the letter of your queen's commander : read it yourself, and then judge the situation in which I am placed.' 'The unfortunate count turned pale, and with a start pushed his plate almost to the middle of the table. The repast was at once at an end. After a pause, during which a dead silence prevailed, Zumalacarregui, addressing the weeping count, added, ' I wished to spare you, and such also I know wouid be my sovereign's wish ; but with such enemies forbearance...
Page 67 - Place and pelf in their opinion cannot be secured unless the revolution is completed by the utter extermination of the royalists ; they equally disregard the laws and the public voice. The Spaniards have always evinced a scrupulous respect for ancient forms, as well as an aversion to changes in their institutions ; and now they are told that they must have nothing that does not bear a 'modern stamp. They have been distinguished beyond other nations by a jealous love of their country and a horror...
Page 334 - The professor of rhetoric was dragged from his hiding* place, and that he might be the sooner despatched, knives were added to the murderous weapons which had been before employed. Another master, endeavouring to escape, was fired upon by an urbano; and as the shot missed, he was bayoneted in the back. Three in disguise escaped into the streets, hoping by this means to save their lives; but they were murdered by the mob, to whom regular communications were made of what was passing jnside the building.
Page 346 - VIIL's time to bring the monastic orders into disrepute, have been practised by the Spanish liberals, and have failed. On the 19th January, 1836, the monks in Madrid were driven out of their convents at two o'clock in the morning, without the slightest regard to age or infirmity. After being grossly insulted and reviled, several were waylaid in the streets by the rayo, or thunderbolt party, and cudgelled in the most unmerciful manner. The measure of ejectment was simultaneously carried into execution...
Page 480 - British legion, — the above is the address of the general-in-chief to his army, every word of which will, I know, find an echo in your own generous and enthusiastic spirit. The moment, then, which you have so long desired, to engage in a general action with the enemy, is arrived. You will rejoice at this intelligence. In Britain and in Europe your conduct excites the deepest interest. The sacred cause you have come to support is at stake. You will, therefore, feel imperatively called on to display...
Page 96 - He was, however, carried away by events ; and the ease with which his advantages were gained, did not restrain his troops from marking their progress by acts of violence, and the wanton effusion of blood. His orders, doubtless, were severe, and too peremptory to be trifled with ; while the more active and ambitious of his officers must have 96 TREATMENT OF THE CARLISTS. been allured by the rewards bestowed on the bloody deed of Lorenzo, to imitate his barbarous example, and to adapt their mode of...
Page 85 - ENTRAPPED. 85 was about to be involved, it being evident that the laws and the great majority of the people were in favour of Charles V. He alluded to the unfortunate contest of 1820, which, he said, was about to be renewed. He appealed to Lorenzo's patriotism and religion, and, as one older in rank and more experienced, implored him to spare the effusion of blood. Finding that he could make no impression upon the queen's representative, Santos Ladron reined his horse and was about to withdraw, when...

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