The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money & Power

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Simon and Schuster, Sep 11, 2012 - Social Science - 928 pages
The Prize recounts the panoramic history of oil -- and the struggle for wealth power that has always surrounded oil. This struggle has shaken the world economy, dictated the outcome of wars, and transformed the destiny of men and nations. The Prize is as much a history of the twentieth century as of the oil industry itself. The canvas of this history is enormous -- from the drilling of the first well in Pennsylvania through two great world wars to the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and Operation Desert Storm.

The cast extends from wildcatters and rogues to oil tycoons, and from Winston Churchill and Ibn Saud to George Bush and Saddam Hussein. The definitive work on the subject of oil and a major contribution to understanding our century, The Prize is a book of extraordinary breadth, riveting excitement -- and great importance.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lincolnpan - LibraryThing

Took me a year plus to finish this massive book. It is readable, interesting and well balanced history of oil. The first three sections I found more engaging than the second half sections. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kday_working - LibraryThing

In today's world, you have to understand the history of oil. This book reads like a novel. You can't put it down -- and it provides an important background to all energy discussions today. Read full review

Contents

List of Maps
Oil on the Brain The Beginning
Our Plan John D Rockefeller and the Combination
Competitive Commerce
The New Century
The Dragon Slain
The Oil Wars The Rise of Royal Dutch the Fall
Beer and Skittles in Persia
The Postwar Petroleum Order
FiftyFifty The New Deal in
Old Mossy and the Struggle for Iran
The Suez Crisis
The Elephants
OPEC and the Surge
Hydrocarbon
THE BATTLE FOR WORLD MASTERY

The Fateful Plunge
The Blood of Victory World War I
Opening the Door on the Middle East The Turkish
From Shortage to Surplus The Age of Gasoline
The Fight for New Production
The Flood
Friendsand Enemies
The Arabian Concessions The World That Frank Holmes Made
WAR AND STRATEGY
Japans Road to
Germanys Formula for
Japans Achilles Heel
The Allies
THE HYDROCARBON
The New Center of Gravity
The Hinge Years Countries Versus Companies
The Oil Weapon
Bidding for Our Life
OPECs Imperium
The Adjustment
The Second Shock The Great Panic
Were Going Down
Just Another Commodity?
The Good Sweating How Low Can It
Crisis in the Gulf
Epilogue
Chronology
Bibliography
Acknowledgments
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Daniel Yergin, chairman of Cambridge Energy Research Associates and the Global Energy Expert for the CNBC business news network, is a highly respected authority on energy, international politics, and economics. Dr. Yergin received the Pulitzer Prize for the number one bestseller The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money & Power, which was also made into an eight-hour PBS/BBC series seen by 20 million people in the United States. The book has been translated into 12 languages. It also received the Eccles Prize for best book on an economic subject for a general audience.

Of Dr. Yergin’s subsequent book, Commanding Heights: The Battle for the World Economy, the Wall Street Journal said: “No one could ask for a better account of the world’s political and economic destiny since World War II.” This book has been translated into 13 languages and Dr. Yergin led the team that turned it into a six-hour PBS/BBC documentary — the major PBS television series on globalization. The series received three Emmy nominations, a CINE Golden Eagle Award and the New York Festival’s Gold World Medal for best documentary. Dr. Yergin’s other books include Shattered Peace, an award-winning history of the origins of the Cold War, Russia 2010 and What It Means for the World (with Thane Gustafson), and Energy Future: The Report of the Energy Project at the Harvard Business School, which he edited with Robert Stobaugh.

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