Women and the Common Life: Love, Marriage, and Feminism

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W. W. Norton, Dec 17, 1997 - Social Science - 196 pages
3 Reviews

"Vintage Lasch.... One of the refreshments of reading him is that he states his beliefs outright."—Andrew Delbanco, New York Times Book Review

Christopher Lasch has examined the role of women and the family in Western society throughout his career as a writer, thinker, and historian. In Women and the Common Life, Lasch suggests controversial linkages between the history of women and the course of European and American history more generally. He sees fundamental changes in intimacy, domestic ideals, and sexual politics taking place as a result of industrialization and the triumph of the market. Questioning a static image of patriarchy, Women and the Common Life insists on a feminist vision rooted in the best possibilities of a democratic common life. In her introduction to the work, Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn offers an original interpretation of the interconnections between these provocative writings.

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Review: Women and the Common Life: Love, Marriage, and Feminism

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A fascinating book worthy of a close reading. As is typical for Lasch this book challenges shibboleths on both the left and the right. The book consists of nine essay each of which can stand on its ... Read full review

Review: Women and the Common Life: Love, Marriage, and Feminism

User Review  - Goodreads

Of posthumous publication, this was a book that historian Christopher Lasch worked on for over two decades and the last to be published before his death in the 90's. Rather than one continuous ... Read full review

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About the author (1997)

Christopher Lasch (1932–1994) was also the author of The True and Only Heaven, The Revolt of the Elites and the Betrayal of Democracy, and other books.

Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn is the author of Black Neighbors (winner of the Berkshire Prize), professor of history at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University, and a frequent contributor to The New Republic.

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