The Ohio Gazetteer: Or, Topographical Dictionary, Describing the Several Countries, Towns, Villages, Canals, Roads, Rivers, Lakes, Springs, Mines & C., in the State of Ohio

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J. Kilbourn, 1831 - Ohio - 336 pages
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Page 71 - ... for the execution of process criminal and civil, the governor shall make proper divisions thereof, and he shall proceed from time to time as circumstances may require to lay out the parts of the District in which the indian titles shall have been extinguished into counties and townships subject however to such alterations as may thereafter be made by the legislature...
Page 43 - ... the external wall alone. From this circumstance, among others, the earth composing the inner wall, is supposed to have been transported from a distance. " Another particular, corroborating this supposition, is there being a level foot way, of about four feet wide, left on the original surface of the ground, between the interior bourn of the ditch, and the exterior base of the inner wall.
Page 56 - ... the first ranges of public lands ever surveyed by ' the general government west of the Ohio river. They are bounded on the north by a line drawn due west from the Pennsylvania State line, where it crosses the Ohio river, to the...
Page 60 - Virginia Military Lands are a body of land lying between the Scioto and Little Miami rivers, and bounded upon the Ohio river on the south. The State of Virginia, from the indefinite and vague terms of expression in its original colonial charter of territory from James I., king of England, in the year 1609, claimed all the continent west of the Ohio rivpr, and of the north and south breadth of Virginia.
Page 63 - XX ranges of military or army lands north, and XXII ranges of congress lands south. In the western borders of this tract is situated the town of Columbus. French grant, a tract of 24,000 acres of land, bordering upon the Ohio river, in the southeastern quarter of Scioto county.
Page 58 - Military Lands are so called from the circumstance of their having been appropriated, by an act of congress of the 1st of June, 1796, to satisfy certain claims of the officers and soldiers of the revolutionary war.
Page 43 - Although this circumstance is far from being conclusive on the subject, yet the following fact almost infallibly proves this conjecture to be well founded. This is, that the interior wall is composed of clay, of which the inhabitants manufacture brick; whereas the exterior circle is composed of dirt and gravel of a similar quality with that which composes the neighboring ground. There is but one original regular opening or passage, intfl the circular fort ; and that is in the east side from the square...
Page 58 - Pennsylvania colonies ; and, indeed, pretensions to these were not finally relinquished without considerable altercation. And after the United States became an independent nation, these interfering claims occasioned much collision of sentiment between them and the state of Connecticut, which was finally compromised, by the United States relinquishing all their claims upon, and guaranteeing to Connecticut the exclusive right of soil to the 3,800,000 acres now described.
Page 63 - XXII ranges of congress lands south. In the western borders of this tract is situated the town of Columbus. French grant, a tract of 24,000 acres of land, bordering upon the Ohio river, in the southeastern quarter of Scioto county. It was granted by congress, in March, 1795, to a number of French families, who lost their lands at Gallipolis, by invalid titles. Twelve hundred acres, additional, were afterwards granted, adjoining the above mentioned tract at its lower end, toward the mouth of Little...
Page 57 - Pennsylvania east, the parallel of the 41st degree of north latitude south, and Sandusky and Seneca counties on the west. It extends 120 miles from east to west, and upon an average 50 from north to south : although, upon the Pennsylvania line, it is 68 miles broad, from north to south. The area is about 3,800,000 acres. It is surveyed into townships of five miles square each. A body of half a million acres is, however, stricken ofT...

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