The Army Air Forces in World War II, Volume Four: The Pacific, Guadalcanal to Saipan, August 1942 to July 1944

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DIANE Publishing
 

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Contents

I
4
III
37
V
61
VII
92
VIII
129
IX
163
X
201
XI
203
XIX
435
XXI
460
XXII
494
XXIII
518
XXIV
547
XXV
549
XXVI
575
XXVII
615

XII
245
XIII
281
XIV
311
XV
357
XVI
359
XVII
403
XVIII
405
XXIX
671
XXX
695
XXXI
697
XXXII
785
XXXIII
791
XXXIV
793

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Page 51 - My anxiety about the Southwest Pacific is to make sure that every possible weapon gets into that area to hold Guadalcanal, and that having held it in this crisis that munitions and planes and crews are on the way to take advantage of our success."4 President Roosevelt had taken a direct hand.
Page 550 - When conflicts in timing and allocation of means exist, due weight should be accorded to the fact that operations in the Central Pacific promise at this time a more rapid advance toward Japan and her vital lines of communication; the earlier acquisition of strategic air bases closer to the Japanese homeland ; and, of greatest importance, are more likely to precipitate a decisive engagement with the Japanese Fleet.
Page 134 - Upon the defeat of the Axis in Europe, in co-operation with other Pacific Powers and, if possible, with Russia, to direct the full resources of the United States and Great Britain to bring about at the earliest possible date the unconditional surrender of Japan.
Page 119 - In the Pacific theater we have a number of islands garrisoned by small forces. These islands are nothing more or less than aerodromes or aerodrome areas from which modern fire-power is launched.
Page 134 - Upon defeat of the Axis in Europe, in cooperation with other Pacific powers and, if possible, with Russia to direct the full resources of the United States and Great Britain to force the unconditional surrender of Japan. If, however, conditions develop which indicate that the war as a whole can be brought more quickly to a successful conclusion by the earlier mounting of a major offensive against Japan, the strategical concept set forth herein may be revised.
Page iii - War, 1939-1945. I. Craven, Wesley Frank, 1905- . II. Gate, James Lea, 1899III. United States. Air Force. Office of Air Force History. IV. United States. Air Force. Air Historical Group. V. United States. USAF Historical Division. D790.A89 1983 940.54'4973 83-17288 ISBNO-912799-03-X (v. 1) to the New Imprint IN March 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt wrote to the Director of the Bureau of the Budget ordering each war agency to prepare "an accurate and objective account" of that agency's war experience.
Page 185 - Following the transports came five 6-175, racks loaded with 3oo-pound packages with parachutes, to be dropped to the paratroopers on call by panel signals as they needed them. This mobile supply unit stayed over Nadzab practically all day serving the paratroops below, dropping a total of fifteen tons of supplies in this manner. Following the echelon to the right and just behind the five supply...
Page 459 - We must merge into one unified force in thought and deed— a force neither British nor American, with the faults of neither and the virtues of both We must establish in Asia a record of Allied air victory of which we can all be proud in the years to come. "Let us write it now in the skies over Burma.
Page 185 - ... which left the column just before the junction of the Watut and the Markham to take out the Jap defensive position at Heath's Plantation, about halfway between Nadzab and Lae. Five weather ships were used prior to and during the show along the route and over the passes, to keep the units straight on weather to be encountered during their flights to the rendezvous. The brass-hat flight of three 6-175 m above the center of the transport column completed the set-up.
Page 185 - MacArthur in a 8-17 over the area watching the show and jumping up and down like a kid. I was flying number two in the same flight with him and the operation really was a magnificent spectacle. I truly don't believe that...

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