Dostoevsky Beyond Dostoevsky: Science, Religion, Philosophy

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Svetlana Evdokimova, Vladimir Golstein
Academic Studies Press, 2016 - Literary Criticism - 413 pages
Dostoevsky Beyond Dostoevsky is a collection of essays with a broad interdisciplinary focus. It includes contributions by leading Dostoevsky scholars, social scientists, scholars of religion and philosophy. The volume considers aesthetics, philosophy, theology, and science of the 19th century Russia and the West that might have informed Dostoevsky's thought and art. Issues such as evolutionary theory and literature, science and society, scientific and theological components of comparative intellectual history, and aesthetic debates of the nineteenth century Russia form the core of the intellectual framework of this book. Dostoevsky's oeuvre with its wide-ranging interests and engagement with philosophical, religious, political, economic, and scientific discourses of his time emerges as a particularly important case for the study of cross-fertilization among disciplines. The individual chapters explore Dostoevsky's real or imaginative dialogues with aesthetic, philosophic, and scientific thought of his predecessors, contemporaries, and successors, revealing Dostoevsky's forward looking thought, as it finds its echoes in modern literary theory, philosophy, theology and science.

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About the author (2016)

A specialist in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature, Svetlana Evdokimova holds PhD from Yale University in Slavic Languages and Literatures and is currently professor of Slavic Studies and Comparative Literature at Brown University. Her main areas of scholarly interest include, Pushkin, Russian and European Romanticism, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, relations between fiction and history, and gender and sexuality in Russian and European literatures. She is the author of Pushkin's Historical Imagination (Yale University Press), Alexander Pushkin's Little Tragedies: The Poetics of Brevity, ed. (Wisconsin University Press), and of the wide range of articles on Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov. She is currently writing a book on Chekhov's relationship with the Russian intelligentsia and its impact on the formation of his literary self.

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