Special Report on Diseases of the Horse

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1907 - Horses - 608 pages
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Page 191 - ... their individuality from their source to their termination. Nerves which convey impressions to the centers are termed sensory, or centripetal, and those which transmit stimulus from the centers to organs of motion are termed motor, or centrifugal. The function of the nervous system may, therefore, be defined in the simplest terms, as follows : It is intended to associate the different parts of the body in such a manner that stimulus applied to one organ may excite or depress the activity of another.
Page 249 - Through the excessively thin walls of the capillaries the fluid part of the blood transudes, to nourish the tissues outside the capillaries; at the same time fluid passes from the tissues into the blood. The fluid, after it passes into the tissues, constitutes the lymph, and acts like a stream irrigating the tissue elements. Much of the surplus of this lymph passes into the lymph vessels, which in their commencement can hardly be treated as independent structures, since...
Page 392 - Thrushes arc to be treated by cleanliness, the removal of all exciting causes, and a return of the frog to its normal condition. As a rule, the diseased and ragged portions of horn are to be pared away and the foot poulticed for a day or two with boiled turnips, to which may be added a few drops of carbolic acid or a handful of powdered charcoal to destroy the offensive smell. The cleft of the frog and the grooves on its edges...
Page 563 - Since the amount of weight borne by a foot is continually changing, and the relations of internal pressure are continuously varying, a foot is, from a physiological viewpoint, never at rest. The most marked changes of form of the hoof occur when the foot bears the greatest weight, namely, at the time of the greatest descent of the fetlock. Briefly, these changes of form are: (1) An expansion or widening of the whole back half of the foot from the coronet to the lower edge of the quarters. This expansion...
Page 258 - The patient should be removed from all such conditions (pasture, faulty feed, exposure, etc.) as may have caused or aggravated the disease, and from dust and irritant fumes and gases. He should be fed from a manger high enough to favor the return of blood from the head, and should be kept from work, especially in a tight collar which would prevent the descent of blood...
Page 534 - During the first half of the last century a large body of veterinarians and medical men protested against the contagious character of this disease, and prevailed by their opinion to such an extent against the common opinion that several of the governments of Europe undertook a series of experiments to determine the right between the contesting parties. At the veterinary school at Alfort, and at the farm of...
Page 220 - This germ forms spores at the end of the organism and grows only in the absence of oxygen. It produces a powerful nerve poison, which causes the symptoms of tetanus. The germ itself multiplies at the point where it is introduced, but its poison is absorbed and is carried by the blood to all parts of the body, and thus the nervous system is poisoned. Deep wounds infected by this germ are more dangerous than superficial wounds, because in them the germ is more remote from the oxygen of the air. Hence,...
Page 536 - The autopsy showed the existence of a number of old tubercles in the lungs which must have existed previous to purchase, more than a year before. Public watering troughs and the feed boxes of boarding stables and the tavern stables of market towns are among the most common recipients for the virus of glanders, which is most dangerous in its fresh state, but cases have been known to be caused by feeding animals in the box or stall in which glandered animals had stood more than a year before.
Page 3 - Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That there be printed and bound...
Page 536 - Equus — the horse, the ass, and the mule — are those which are the most susceptible to contract glanders, but in these we find a much greater receptivity in the ass and mule than we do in the horse. In the ass and mule in almost all cases the period of incubation is short and the disease develops in an acute form. We find that the kind of horse infected has an influence on the character of the disease; in full-blooded fat horses of a sanguinary temperament, the disease usually develops in an...

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