To Have and Have Not: Southeast Asian Raw Materials and the Origins of the Pacific War

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University of California Press, Jan 1, 1995 - History - 280 pages
Jonathan Marshall makes a provocative statement: it was not ideological or national security considerations that led the United States into war with Japan in 1941. Instead, he argues, it was a struggle for access to Southeast Asia's vast storehouse of commodities--rubber, oil, and tin--that drew the U.S. into the conflict. Boldly departing from conventional wisdom, Marshall reexamines the political landscape of the time and recreates the mounting tension and fear that gripped U.S. officials in the months before the war.
Unusual in its extensive use of previously ignored documents and studies, this work records the dilemmas of the Roosevelt administration: it initially hoped to avoid conflict with Japan and, after many diplomatic overtures, it came to see war as inevitable. Marshall also explores the ways that international conflicts often stem from rivalries over land, food, energy, and industry. His insights into "resource war," the competition for essential commodities, will shed new light on U.S. involvement in other conflicts--notably in Vietnam and the Persian Gulf. Jonathan Marshall makes a provocative statement: it was not ideological or national security considerations that led the United States into war with Japan in 1941. Instead, he argues, it was a struggle for access to Southeast Asia's vast storehouse of commodities--rubber, oil, and tin--that drew the U.S. into the conflict. Boldly departing from conventional wisdom, Marshall reexamines the political landscape of the time and recreates the mounting tension and fear that gripped U.S. officials in the months before the war.
Unusual in its extensive use of previously ignored documents and studies, this work records the dilemmas of the Roosevelt administration: it initially hoped to avoid conflict with Japan and, after many diplomatic overtures, it came to see war as inevitable. Marshall also explores the ways that international conflicts often stem from rivalries over land, food, energy, and industry. His insights into "resource war," the competition for essential commodities, will shed new light on U.S. involvement in other conflicts--notably in Vietnam and the Persian Gulf.
 

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User Review  - Winomaster - LibraryThing

This is an important book in how it lays out the importance of asian sources of strategic materials in driving the US to war in the Pacific. It also is a good source on the pre-war diplomacy aimed in ... Read full review

Contents

The Rush to Stockpile
33
1940
54
JanuaryJune 1941
95
JulyDecember 1941
121
Roosevelt Plans for War
157
Defining the National Interest
173
Notes
189
Bibliography
257
Index
273
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Jonathan Marshall is the economics editor for the San Francisco Chronicle and coauthor (with Peter Dale Scott) of Cocaine Politics: Drugs, Armies, and the CIA in Central America (California, 1991).

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