The Rabbits

Front Cover
Simply Read Books, 2003 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
5 Reviews
Illustrated by Shaun Tan. Bestselling author, Marsden, has created a dramatically moving allegory of colonisation told from the perspective of native animals, in this stunningly illustrated volume. Examining the consequences of the arrival of a group of rabbits with unfamiliar ways, the story shows how colonisation can result in the domination of the environment and its other inhabitants. A thought-provoking book, it earned its author and illustrator the CBCA Picture Book of the Year.

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i love this book but i would like to ask a question regarding the title of the book: why is the title called The Rabbits??

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I read this book today. I honestly love because it tells you how Europeans created our country that we live in but is also very sad because they had war and the wallabies lost them all the time and then the rabbits created the stolen generation and sent the babies and older children away so there were no more aboriginals left in Australia. 

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About the author (2003)

John Marsden was born in Victoria, Australia in 1950. He was working as a teacher when his first book, So Much to Tell You, was published in 1987. His other works include the Tomorrow series and Ellie chronicles. He bought an 850-acre property just outside Melbourne, Australia where he ran writers' courses and camps for eight years. In 2006, he opened a school there called Candlebark.

Shaun Tan was born in 1974 in Fremantle, Western Australia. He is an artist, writer, and film maker. In 2006, his wordless graphic novel The Arrival won the "Book of the Year" prize as part of the New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards. The same book won the Children's Book Council of Australia "Picture Book of the Year" award in 2007 and the Western Australian Premier's Book Awards Premier's Prize in 2006. For his career contribution to "children's and young adult literature in the broadest sense" Tan won the 2011 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award from the Swedish Arts Council, the biggest prize in children's literature. In 2015 his title, Rules of Summer, was one of four books selected for the United States Board of Books for Young People list of Outstanding International Books for children and young adults. His book, The Singing Bones, won the 2015 Aurealis Awards for Best Graphic Novel/Illustrated work.

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