The Crimea and Odessa: Journal of a Tour, with an Account of the Climate and Vegetation

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J. Murray, 1855 - Crimea - 323 pages
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Page 129 - To that illustrious port we came, by rocks Uninterrupted flank'd on either side Of towering height, while prominent the shores And bold, converging at the haven's mouth Leave narrow pass. We push'd our galleys in. Then moor'd them side by side ; for never surge There lifts its head, or great or small, but clear We found, and motionless, the shelter'd flood. Myself alone, staying my bark without, Secured her well with hawsers to a rock At the land's point, then climb'd the rugged steep, And spying...
Page 21 - Oration against Leptines, c. 9. which have been long since obliterated. The opulence and wealth of ancient Panticapaeum, the most northern .colony of the Milesians, must have been vast. These tumuli have been ransacked century after century to search for gold and silver, or other precious objects ; and yet, down to the present day, coins, medals, rings, earrings, bracelets, clasps, and such articles are still found. The workmanship is admirable. Many of these articles indicate a civilisation and...
Page 260 - ... to the finest city. Prince Woronzoff, and the principal government officers and wealthy merchants, reside in this part of the town. A handsome walk, planted with trees in the form of an avenue, occupies a considerable space between this row of houses and the ridge of the hill, where it descends somewhat precipitously; so that, especially on beautiful autumnal evenings, hundreds of pedestrians enjoy the pleasant and refreshing sea air, and the prospect of the wide sea, that faithful image of eternity.106...
Page 227 - ... within sight of Arco is the dreariest, wildest, and most piteous imaginable. Similar tracts of desolation are occasionally encountered in the upper Alpine solitudes on the snow line, where neither tree nor blade of grass will grow, but nowhere else can I remember finding such an effect down in a valley which is only a few feet above the level of the sea. At one point, near a hamlet called Pietra Murata, the Val Sarca becomes a veritable horror. The valley is full of mountain debris. A prehistoric...
Page 265 - These dangerous winds do not frequently occur in the summer, for a northerly wind blows almost without intermission at that season. Though less injurious to the vessels, it is extremely unpleasant to the inhabitants of the town, since, especially during the hot days of July and August, it brings the dust from the parched plains and steppe, occasioning insufferable heat, which is only slightly diminished in the evening. Vessels...
Page 259 - Odessa from the steppe, as in our case, it is scarcely possible to trust the senses, when the rows of splendid houses, whose outline becomes constantly more distinct, gradually rise to view, and, after having seen nothing for a length of time but sky and steppe, we suddenly behold the busy scene in all its magnificence.
Page 105 - ... town, we could not hold it for any length of time under the guns of the Russian ships in harbour, and the fire of the opposite citadel and forts. A brief description of Sebastopol may here appropriately be given. The town is built in an irregular and scattered manner, but has on the whole a cheerful aspect. It stands on a tongue of land, which on one side runs down to the sea, while on the other it rises to the elevation of the cliffs. The port which separates the citadel and north part of the...
Page 54 - ... the first the streets are narrow and crooked, the backs of the houses stand towards the streets, or are in the centre of a courtyard contiguous to a garden planted with shrubs and trees. With the exception of that quarter, where the artizans sit at work and sell their goods, all is still and dull. It is very rarely that a Tartar man, or even a child, is to be seen ; and female figures are still more rare. When women do appear, they wander about veiled from head to foot in a white cloth. The new...
Page 261 - A flight of steps, unequalled in magnificence, leads down the declivity to the shore and harbour. It is about 200 feet broad...
Page 32 - ... but down to the middle of the fifteenth century the Genoese colonists at Kaffa continued to enlarge their possessions, so that all the most important harbours on the southern coast of the Euxine came under Genoese control. But in 1453 Mohamed II. captured Constantinople ; in 1462 he took Trebizond ; and, after the lapse of thirteen more years, the wealthy and powerful Kaffa surrendered to the same ruthless conqueror, without attempting the slightest resistance. The place surrendered without terms,...

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