Demons of Disorder: Early Blackface Minstrels and Their World

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jul 28, 1997 - Drama - 236 pages
Carnival, charivari, mumming plays, peasant festivals, and even early versions of the Santa Claus myth--all of these forms of entertainment influenced and shaped blackface minstrelsy in the first half of the nineteenth century. In his fascinating study Demons of Disorder, musicologist Dale Cockrell studies issues of race and class by analyzing their cultural expressions, and investigates the roots of still-remembered songs such as "Jim Crow," "Zip Coon," and "Dan Tucker." The first book on the blackface tradition written by a leading musicologist, Demons of Disorder is an important achievement in music history and culture.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Prologue
1
Blackface on the Early American Stage
13
Blackface in the Streets
30
Jim Crow
62
Zip Coon
92
Old Dan Tucker
140
Epilogue
163
Notes
171
Bibliography
203
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 213 - A Retrospect of the Boston Tea-Party, with a memoir of George RT Hewes, a survivor of the little band of patriots who drowned the tea in Boston Harbour in 1773. By a Citizen of New York.

Bibliographic information