Bankruptcy in United States History

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Beard Books, 1935 - Law - 195 pages
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Review: Bankruptcy in United States History

User Review  - Evan Thomas - Goodreads

Part of my reading series on bankruptcy. Too often a list of legislative acts, who supported them and who didn't. All the big ideas have to be teased out. The prevailing theme about sectional ... Read full review

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Contents

THE PERIOD OF THE CREDITOR 17891827
3
THE PERIOD OF THE DEBTOR 18271861
49
THE PERIOD OF NATIONAL INTEREST 18611935
95

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Page 7 - The power of establishing uniform laws of bankruptcy is so intimately connected with the regulation of commerce, and will prevent so many frauds where the parties or their property may lie or be removed into different States, that the expediency of it seems not likely to be drawn into question.
Page 4 - Though it be a doctrine of modern date, we think it now well established that the capital stock of a corporation, especially its unpaid subscriptions, is a trust fund for the benefit of the general creditors of the corporation. And when we consider the rapid development of corporations' as instrumentalities of the commercial and business world in the last few years, with the corresponding necessity of adapting legal principles to the new and varying exigencies of this business, it is no solid objection...
Page 6 - The Congress shall have power ... to establish uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States.— Art.
Page 5 - The third will be found in that clause which declares that Congress shall have power "to establish an UNIFORM RULE of naturalization throughout the United States.

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About the author (1935)

CHARLES WARREN has taught English and Film at the New School and Harvard University, and currently teaches Film and Writing at Tufts University. He is coeditor of Jean-Luc Godard's Hail Mary (1993) and author of T. S. Eliot on Shakespeare (1987).

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