The Museum of Foreign Literature, Science and Art, Volume 10 (Google eBook)

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E. Littell, 1827
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Page 66 - devout prayer to that Eternal Spirit, who can enrich with all utterance and knowledge ;" and whether " in the troubled sea of noises and hoarse disputes," or, '' in the quiet and still air of delightful
Page 143 - Remember,' and repeated the lines, with an emphasis which now assumes something of prophetic energy. ' Absent or dead, still let a friend be dear : A sigh the absent claims : the dead a tear.' " On the tenth of January, 1826, Mr. Murray being at dinner, was seized with a slight paralytic affection in his
Page 269 - Earth to earth, and dust to dust!" Here the evil and the just, Here the youthful and the old, Here the fearful and the bold, Here the matron and the maid In one silent bed are laid; Here the vassal and the king Side by side lie withering ; Here the sword and sceptre
Page 185 - now at set of sun; Woman, o'er the lowly slain, Weeping on his burial-plain ; Ye that triumph, ye that sigh, Kindred by one holy tie ! Heaven's first star alike ye see— Lift the heart
Page 419 - still, being delighted with a horse that " snuffs the females," in the English Eneid only, borrowed it to grace his own Iliad. With this exception, perhaps Virgil himself might prefer Dryden's imaginative paraphrase to his own six Latin lines:— " Freed from his keepers thus, with broken reins The wanton courser prances o'er the plains;
Page 198 - On this I will not dwell and hang, The changeling would not feel a pang Though these should meet his eye ! No skies so blue, or so serene As then ;—no leaves look half so green As clothed the playground tree ! All things I loved are alter'd
Page 392 - And throned Eternity in icy halls Of cold sublimity, where forms and falls The Avalanche," the thunderbolt of Snow ' All that expands the spirits, yet appals, Gathers around these
Page 300 - along the shore ;— All, through his wakening bosom swept : He clasped his country's tree, and wept." Oh ! scorn him not !—the strength, whereby The patriot girds himself to die— Th' unconquerable power, which fills The freeman, battling on his hills— Those have one fountain, deep and clear,—
Page 335 - By the waving tree thro' which thine eye First look'd in love to the summer sky ; By the dewy gleam, by the very breath Of the primrose tufts in the grass beneath, Upon thy heart there is laid a spell— Holy and precious—oh ! guard it well ! By the sleepy ripple of the stream, Which hath lull'd
Page 298 - My sight was like a drunkard's sight, And my head began to swim, To see their jaws all white with foam, Like the ravenous ocean brim ;— But when the wild dogs trotted away, Their jaws were bloody and grim ! Their jaws were bloody and grim, good Lord ! There was nought of him but some ribbons of

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