A Short History of Algiers: With a Concise View of the Origin of the Rupture Between Algiers and the United States : to Wich is Added a Copious Appendix Containing Letters from Captains Penrose, M'Shane, and Sundry Other American Captives ...

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Evert Duyckinck, 1805 - Algiers (Algeria) - 106 pages
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Page 3 - Ocean ; on the west by the Atlantic Ocean ; and on the east by the Red Sea and...
Page 95 - He hath a tear for pity, and a hand Open as day for melting charity...
Page 61 - Algiers ; but that for his part he never would consent to deliver up any thing that had been taken from the French. He immediately acquainted the soldiery with what had passed ; which so exasperated them, that they murdered the dey that very night, and on the morrow chose Mezomorto in his place.
Page 92 - ... of your real friend, and affectionate fellow-citizen, D. HUMPHREYS. PS Though I have repeatedly remarked, that it may perhaps, (for...
Page 61 - French flag ; which being granted, 142 of them were immediately delivered up, with a promise of sending him the remainder as soon as they could be got from the different parts of the country. Accordingly Du Quesne sent his commissary-general and one of his engineers into the town ; but with express orders to insist upon the delivery of all the French captives without exception, together with the effects...
Page 63 - English ships when they could conveniently come at them. Upon some infringement of this kind, captain Beach drove ashore, and burnt seven of their frigates in 1695 ; which produced a renewal of the treaty five years after : but it was not till the taking of Gibraltar and Port Mahon that Britain could have a sufficient check upon them to enforce the observation of treaties ; and these have since proved such restraints upon Algiers, that they still continue to pay a greater deference to the English...
Page 32 - For this practice of buying and selling slaves," he says, " we are not entitled to charge the Algerines with any exclusive degree of barbarity. The Christians of Europe and America carry on this commerce one hundred times more extensively than the Algerines. It has received a recent sanction from the immaculate Divan of Britain. Nobody seems even to be surprised by a diabolical kind of advertisements which for some months past have frequently adorned the newspapers of Philadelphia. The French fugitives...
Page 48 - Algiers, in which they were more fortunate than usual, their fleet being only driven back by contrary winds, so that they came off without loss. In 1609, the Moors being expelled from Spain, flocked in great numbers to Algiers ; and as many of them were very able sailors, they undoubtedly contributed to make the Algerine fleet so formidable as it became soon after.
Page 62 - Mezomorto, unmoved at all these disasters, and the vast number of the slain, whose blood ran in rivulets along the streets, or rather grown furious and desperate, sought...
Page 37 - ... and to erect batteries on all places that might favor the landing of an enemy. All these have since received greater improvements from time to time, as often as there was. occasion for them.

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