Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy

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Harvard University Press, 1985 - Philosophy - 230 pages
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In this book Bernard Williams delivers a sustained indictment of moral theory from Kant onward. His goal is nothing less than to reorient ethics toward the individual. He deals with the most thorny questions in contemporary philosophy and offers new ideas about issues such as relativism, objectivity, and the possibility of ethical knowledge.
 

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Contents

Socrates Question
1
The Archimedean Point
22
WeilBeing
30
Practical Reason
54
Styles of Ethical Theory
71
Theory and Prejudice
93
The Linguistic Turn
120
Knowledge Science Convergence
132
Relativism and Reflection
156
Morality the Peculiar Institution
174
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About the author (1985)

Bernard Williams was White's Professor of Moral Philosophy, Oxford, and Deutsch Professor of Philosophy, University of California at Berkeley.

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