Calling All Heroes: A Manual for Taking Power: A Novel

Front Cover
PM Press, Jul 1, 2010 - Fiction - 128 pages
5 Reviews
The euphoric idealism of grassroots reform and the tragic reality of revolutionary failure are at the center of this speculative novel that opens with a real historical event. On October 2, 1968, 10 days before the Summer Olympics in Mexico, the Mexican government responds to a student demonstration in Tlatelolcothe by firing into the crowd, killing more than 200 students and civilians and wounding hundreds more. The massacre does not receive much international attention and though many students are detained, no officials are held accountable. The story then skips ahead two years to a hospital in Mexico City and introduces Nestor, a fictional journalist who witnessed the shootings at Tlatelolcothe. He has been admitted to the hospital for a knife wound, and as he lies in bed, his fevered imagination goes back to the day of the riot. In his delirious state, he becomes so desperate he calls on the heroes of his youth—Sherlock Holmes, Doc Holliday, Wyatt Earp, and D'Artagnan among them—to join him in launching a new movement of reform.
 

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Review: Calling All Heroes: A Manual for Taking Power

User Review  - Jen - Goodreads

"You slept well, peacefully, filled of that sensation of calmness that comes from knowing you're not alone in your madness." Read in the hammock in one evening. Creative storytelling. Great prose. Read full review

Review: Calling All Heroes: A Manual for Taking Power

User Review  - Will - Goodreads

"It was a bad year for writing about the previous year." Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Note
6
I If You Werent HereWhere Would You Be?
7
A as in Accident
10
II General Without an Army
15
B as in Biography
17
III Interview
21
C as in Context
23
IV The Decision to Appeal to the Heroes
27
J as in Justification
75
XI Concerning the Insurrection
76
K as in Kulture
78
XII Concerning the Insurrection II
82
L as in Legend
86
XIII Judicial Police and Musketeers
89
M as in Movement The Following Year Told Another Year Later
93
XIV Concerning the Insurrection III
97

D as in Documents
29
V Liliana General HeadquartersLetters and Telegrams
43
E as in Examination
47
VI Shadows and Answers
49
F as in Fiesta
53
VII A Question Several Questions
55
G as in Grab
57
VIII The Arrival of the Characters and the Doubts of the Host
59
H as in Hunches
63
IX Strategy Infirmary and Mau Mau
66
I as in Inertia
70
X Momentous Meeting in the Hospital Room
72
N as in Novels
99
XV Organized Forces and Those Who Go It Alone
105
O as in Outcasts
108
XVI To Return
111
Clarifications About Some Characters
113
Clarifications About a Moment
117
About the Author
119
About the Translator
120
About PM Press
121
Friends of PM Press
122
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Paco Ignacio Taibo II is the author of 68; Guevara, Also Known as Che; and The Shadow of the Shadow. His biographies of Guevara and Pancho Villa have sold more than one million copies worldwide, and he is the founder and organizer of the annual crime fiction film festival, Semana Negra, held each summer in Spain. He has won numerous international literary awards, including three Hammett Awards and the National History Award from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History. He lives in Mexico City, Mexico.

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