Vedic Mathematics

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Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 1992 - Mathematics - 367 pages
35 Reviews
This epoch-making and monumental work on Vedic Mathematics unfolds a new method of approach. It relates to the truth of numbers and magnitudes equally applicable to all sciences and arts.
 

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very nice.i want buy your book in hindi language

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i never found batter than this book for mathematics

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Contents

I
xxv
II
xxxv
III
3
VII
13
IX
35
X
47
XII
55
XIV
69
XLI
171
XLIII
177
XLV
181
XLVII
187
XLIX
191
L
193
LI
229
LIII
243

XVI
75
XVII
79
XVIII
83
XX
89
XXII
95
XXIV
99
XXV
117
XXVII
125
XXIX
131
XXXI
135
XXXIII
147
XXXV
157
XXXVII
161
XXXIX
165
LV
261
LVII
273
LIX
283
LXI
287
LXIII
293
LXV
297
LXVII
305
LXIX
315
LXXI
337
LXXIII
341
LXXIV
343
LXXVI
349
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Page xxxix - The importance of the creation of the zero mark can never be exaggerated. This giving to airy nothing, not merely a local habitation and a name, a picture, a symbol, but helpful power, is the characteristic of the Hindu race from whence it sprang. It is like coining the Nirvana into dynamos. No single mathematical creation has been more potent for the general on-go of intelligence and power.
Page xxxv - Veda'' has this derivational meaning, ie the fountain-head and illimitable store-house of all knowledge. This derivation, in effect, means, connotes and implies that the Vedas should contain within themselves all the knowledge needed by mankind relating not only to the so-called 'spiritual' (or other-worldly) matters but also to those usually described as purely "secular", "temporal...
Page xxxvi - ... unravel the too-long hidden mysteries of philosophy and science contained in ancient India's Vedic lore, with the consequence that, after eight years of concentrated contemplation in forestsolitude, we were at long last able to recover the long lost keys which alone could unlock the portals thereof. 9. And we were agreeably astonished and intensely gratified to find that exceedingly tough mathematical problems (which the mathematically most advanced present day Western scientific world had spent...
Page xxxvii - We may, however, at this point, draw the earnest attention of everyone concerned to the following salient items thereof: i. The Sutras (aphorisms) apply to and cover each and every part of each and every chapter of each and every branch of mathematics (including arithmetic, algebra, geometry — plane and solid, trigonometry- plane and spherical, conies — geometrical and analytical, astronomy, calculus — differential and integral etc., etc. In fact, there is no part of mathematics, pure or applied,...
Page xxxii - Gurudeva reconstucted, on the basis of intuitive revelation, from materials scattered here and there in the Atharvaveda. Revered Gurudeva used to say that he had written sixteen volumes on these Sutras, one for each Sutra and that the manuscripts of the said volumes were deposited at the house of one of his disciples. Unfortunately, the said manuscripts were lost irretrievably from the place of their deposit and this colossal loss was finally confirmed in 1956. Revered Gurudeva was not much perturbed...
Page xxxviii - Indian and also of foreign universities. 15. In this connection, it is a gratifying fact that unlike some so-called Indologists (of the type hereinabove referred to) there have been some great modern mathematicians and historians of mathematics (like Prof. GP Halstead, Professor Ginsburg, Prof. De Moregan, Prof. Hutton etc.,) who have, as truth-seekers and truth-lovers, evinced a truly scientific attitude and frankly expressed their intense and whole-hearted appreciation of ancient India's grand...
Page xl - Morgan etc.) have not been guilty of even the least exaggeration in their candid admission that "even the highest and farthest reaches of modern Western mathematics have not yet brought the Western world even to the threshold of Ancient Indian Vedic Mathematics".
Page xxxv - Vedas should contain within themselves all the knowledge needed by mankind relating not only to the so-called 'spiritual' (or other-worldly) matters but also to those usually described as purely "secular", "temporal", or "wordly"; and also to the means required by humanity as such for the achievement of all-round, complete and perfect success in all conceivable directions and that there can be no adjectival or restrictive epithet calculated (or tending) to limit that knowledge down in any sphere,...
Page xxviii - Indian culture, spreading of Sanštana Dharma, revival of the highest human and moral values and enkindling of the loftiest spiritual enlightenment throughout the world and he dedicated his whole life to this lofty and noble mission. From his very early days Jagadguruji was aware of the need for the right interpretation of

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