The Poetical Works of Thomas Moore: Complete in One Volume

Front Cover
Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1845 - 691 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

1843/691p./150

Contents


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 239 - eyes— That sacred gloom, those fires divine, So grand, so countless, LORD ! are Thine. And every flower the Summer wreathes Is born beneath that kindling eye. Where'er we turn, thy glories shine, And all things fair and bright are Thine ! THE BIRD, LET LOOSE. (AiR BEETHOVEN.) > THE bird, let loose in eastern skies,
Page 189 - Yon may break, you may shatter the vase, if you will, But the scent of the roses will hang round it still. OH! DOUBT ME NOT. Он! doubt me not—the season Is o'er, when Folly made me rove, And now the vestal, Reason, Shall watch the fire
Page 165 - the Inseparability of Church and State, and their (what is called) " standing and falling together," than this ancient apologue of Jack and Jill. Jack, of course, represents the State in this Ingenious little Allegory. Jack fell down, And broke his Crown, And Jill came tumbling after.
Page 222 - How many a tale their music tells, Of youth, and home, and that sweet time, When last I heard their soothing chime. Those joyous hours are pass'd away ; And many a heart, that then was gay, Within the tomb now darkly dwells, And hears no more those evening bells. And so 'twill be when I am
Page 239 - So soft, so radiant, LORD! are Thine. When Night, with wings of starry gloom, O'ershadows all the earth and skies, Like some dark, beauteous bird, whose plume Is sparkling with unnumber'd eyes— That sacred gloom, those fires divine, So grand, so countless, LORD ! are Thine. And every flower the Summer wreathes Is born beneath that kindling eye.
Page 393 - bless'd with the odour our goblet gives forth, What Spirit the sweets of his Eden would miss? For, oh ! if there be an Elysium on earth, It is this, it is this. The Georgian's song was scarcely mate. When the same measure, sound for sound, Was caught up by another lute, And so divinely
Page 387 - A something, light as air — a look, A word unkind or wrongly taken — Oh ! love, that tempests never shook, A breath, a touch like this hath shaken. And ruder words will soon rush in To spread the breach that words begin ; And eyes forget the gentle ray They wore in courtship's smiling day
Page 189 - Which come in the night-time of sorrow and care, And bring back the features that joy used to wear. Long, long be my heart with such memories fill'd ! Like the vase, in which roses have once been distill'd— Yon may break, you may shatter the vase, if you will, But the
Page 247 - Thy sun shall be no more thy light by day ; neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto thee : but the LORD shall be unto thee an
Page 186 - May valour ne'er His standard rear Against the cause of Freedom ! Oh the Shamrock, the green, immortal Shamrock Chosen leaf Of Bard and Chief, Old Erin's native Shamrock ! AT THE MID HOUR OF NIGHT. AT the mid hour of night, when stars are weeping I fly To the lone vale we lov'd, when life shone

Bibliographic information