The Suppression of the African Slave-trade to the United States of America, 1638-1870

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1896 - Antislavery movements - 335 pages
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Well-documented classic examines the South's plantation economy and its influence on the slave trade, the role of Northern merchants in financing the slave trade during the 19th century, and much more.
 

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Contents

I
5
II
11
III
20
V
31
VI
43
VIII
57
X
74
XI
98
XIII
135
XIV
155
XV
172
XVII
198

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 206 - And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.
Page 259 - An Act to protect the commerce of the United States, and punish the crime of piracy," and also to make further provision for punishing the crime of piracy.
Page 193 - The importation of negroes of the African race, from any foreign country, other than the slaveholding States or Territories of the United States of America, is hereby forbidden, and Congress is required to pass such laws as shall effectually prevent the same.
Page 306 - Report of the Committee to which was referred so much of the President's Message as relates to the Slave Trade. February $th 1821 ; Read, and ordered to lie upon the Table.
Page 251 - Whereas the traffic in slaves is irreconcilable with the principles of humanity and justice, and whereas both His Majesty and the United States are desirous of continuing their efforts to promote its entire abolition, it is hereby agreed that both the contracting parties shall use their best endeavours to accomplish so desirable an object.
Page 225 - The importation of slaves into the colonies from the coast of Africa hath long been considered as a trade of great inhumanity, and under its present encouragement, we have too much reason to fear will endanger the very existence of your Majesty's American dominions.
Page 243 - States to any foreign place or country, approved March twenty-second, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine :" " An act in addition to the act, entitled an act to prohibit the carrying on the slave trade from the United States to any foreign place or country...
Page 308 - Society shall be called the American Society for colonizing the free people of color of the United States.
Page 243 - State from bringing with them such persons as are deemed slaves by the laws of any one of the United States...
Page 252 - The United States, having been the first to abolish within the extent of their authority the transportation of the natives of Africa into...

About the author (1896)

Civil rights leader and author, William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts on February 23, 1868. He earned a B.A. from both Harvard and Fisk universities, an M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard, and studied at the University of Berlin. He taught briefly at Wilberforce University before he came professor of history and economics at Atlanta University in Ohio (1896-1910). There, he wrote The Souls of Black Folk (1903), in which he pointed out that it was up to whites and blacks jointly to solve the problems created by the denial of civil rights to blacks. In 1905, Du Bois became a major figure in the Niagara Movement, a crusading effort to end discrimination. The organization collapsed, but it prepared the way for the founding of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), in which Du Bois played a major role. In 1910, he became editor of the NAACP magazine, a position he held for more than 20 years. Du Bois returned to Atlanta University in 1932 and tried to implement a plan to make the Negro Land Grant Colleges centers of black power. Atlanta approved of his idea, but later retracted its support. When Du Bois tried to return to NAACP, it rejected him too. Active in several Pan-African Congresses, Du Bois came to know Fwame Nkrumah, the first president of Ghana, and Jono Kenyatta the president of Kenya. In 1961, the same year Du Bois joined the Communist party, Nkrumah invited him to Ghana as a director of an Encyclopedia Africana project. He died there on August 27, 1963, after becoming a citizen of that country.

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