Manufacturing Confucianism: Chinese Traditions & Universal Civilization

Front Cover
Duke University Press, 1997 - Religion - 444 pages
1 Review
Could it be that the familiar and beloved figure of Confucius was invented by Jesuit priests? In Manufacturing Confucianism, Lionel M. Jensen reveals this very fact, demonstrating how sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Western missionaries used translations of the ancient ru tradition to invent the presumably historical figure who has since been globally celebrated as philosopher, prophet, statesman, wise man, and saint.
Tracing the history of the Jesuits’ invention of Confucius and of themselves as native defenders of Confucius’s teaching, Jensen reconstructs the cultural consequences of the encounter between the West and China. For the West, a principal outcome of this encounter was the reconciliation of empirical investigation and theology on the eve of the scientific revolution. Jensen also explains how Chinese intellectuals in the early twentieth century fashioned a new cosmopolitan Chinese culture through reliance on the Jesuits’ Confucius and Confucianism. Challenging both previous scholarship and widespread belief, Jensen uses European letters and memoirs, Christian histories and catechisms written in Chinese, translations and commentaries on the Sishu, and a Latin summary of Chinese culture known as the Confucius Sinarum Philosophus to argue that the national self-consciousness of Europe and China was bred from a cultural ecumenism wherein both were equal contributors.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

PART ONE THE MANUFACTURE
29
The Jesuits and Their
77
The Meaning and End of Confucianism
135
PART TWO MAKING SENSE OF
149
Hu Shi Ru and
217
Glossary
287
Notes
305
Bibliography
379
Index
421
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1997)

\

Lionel M. Jensen is Assistant Professor of History and Director of the Program in Chinese Studies at the University of Colorado at Denver.

Bibliographic information