Fanny Fern: An Independent Woman

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Rutgers University Press, 1994 - Biography & Autobiography - 396 pages
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Fanny Fern is a name that is unfamiliar to most contemporary readers. In this first modern biography, Warren revives the reputation of a once-popular 19th-century newspaper columnist and novelist. Fern, the pseudonym for Sara Payson Willis Parton, was born in 1811 and grew up in a society with strictly defined gender roles. From her rebellious childhood to her adult years as a newspaper columnist, Fern challenged society's definition of women's place with her life and her words. Fern wrote a weekly newspaper column for 21 years and, using colorful language and satirical style, advocated women's rights and called for social reform. Warren blends Fern's life story with an analysis of the social and literary world of 19th-century America.
 

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Fanny Fern: an independent woman

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Fanny Fern is a name that is unfamiliar to most contemporary readers. In this first modern biography, Warren revives the reputation of a once-popular 19th-century newspaper columnist and novelist ... Read full review

Contents

Prologue Who Is Fanny Fern?
1
Deacons Daughter
5
Hartford Female Seminary
26
BreadMaking and ButtonHole Stitching
43
Marriage Motherhood and Money
61
Dark Days
74
The Birth of Fanny Fern
90
Columnist and Author
104
Famous and Infamous
179
Fanny Ford and Rose Clark
195
A Practical Bluestocking
211
The Civil War and Effie
235
At My Post
257
Last Years
272
The Spectrum of Ideas
288
Epilogue In Her Own Voice
306

Ruth Hall
120
Robert Bonner and James Parton
143
Walt Whitman
160
Notes
313
Index
365
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About the author (1994)

Warren is a professor of English at Queens College.

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