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Books Books 1 - 10 of 17 on He had become stupified, and could not fully comprehend the enormous ruin which he....
" He had become stupified, and could not fully comprehend the enormous ruin which he had precipitated upon himself — crushing at once " mind, body, and estate." His motions seemed actuated by a species of diabolical influence. He saw the nest of hornets... "
Passages from the diary of a late physician - Page 296
by Samuel Warren - 1838
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 30

1831
...which it induces I The demons who fluttered about him, no longer thought of masking themselves, out stood boldly in all their naked hideousness before...yet still he lived and gambled on from week to week, irom day to day, from hour to hour, in the delusive hope of recovering himself. His heart was paralyzed...
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Affecting scenes: being passages from the diary of a physician, Volume 2

Samuel Warren - History - 1831
...left him — worse and worse. Poor Beauchamp's life might justly be said to be a perpetual phrensy — passed in alternate paroxysms of remorse, despair,...delusive hope of recovering himself. His heart was paralyzed — its feelings all smothered beneath the perpetual pressure of a gamester's anxieties....
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 30

1831
...Alas, Beauchamp was not the first who has felt the fatal fascination of play, the utter obli viousness of consequences which it induces ! The demons who...delusive hope of recovering himself. His heart was paralyzed — its feelings all smothered beneath the perpetual pressure of a gamester's anxieties....
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Affecting Scenes: Being Passages from the Diary of a Physician, Volume 2

1832
...left him — worse and worse. Poor Beauchamp's life might justly be said to be a perpetual phrensy — passed in alternate paroxysms of remorse, despair,...delusive hope of recovering himself. His heart was paralyzed — its feelings all smothered beneath the perpetual pressure of a gamester's anxieties....
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Affecting scenes: being passages from the diary of a physician / [by Samuel ...

Samuel Warren - 1833
...said to be a perpetual phrensy — passed ii i alternate paroxysms of remorse, despair, rage, feai, and all the other baleful passions that can tear and...delusive hope of recovering himself. His heart was paralyzed— its feelings all smothered beneath the perpetual pressure of a gamester's anxieties. It...
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Affecting Scenes: Being Passages from the Diary of a Physician, Volume 2

Samuel Warren - 1833
...not the first who has felt the fatal fascination of play, the utter obliviousness of con. sequences which it induces! The demons who fluttered about him...delusive hope of recovering himself. His heart was paralyzed—its feelings all smothered beneath the perpetual pressure of a gamester's anxieties. It...
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Passages from the Diary of a Late Physician, Volume 1

Samuel Warren - Physicians - 1844
...other baleful passions that can tear and distract the human soul. He had become stupefied ; and conld not fully comprehend the enormous ruin which he had...delusive hope of recovering himself. His heart was paralyzed — its feelings all smothered beneath the perpetual pressure of a gamester's anxieties....
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Memoirs and letters of C. Boner. With letters of M.R. Mitford to him. Ed. by ...

Charles Boner, Mary Russell Mitford - 1871
...about a month ago, I continued to grow weaker and weaker, and worse and worse. My death was expected from week to week, from day to day, from hour to hour. Mr. May, however, in spite of his immense practice, of my distance from Reading, and of his bad opinion...
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Memoirs and Letters of Charles Boner: With Letters of Mary Russell Mitford ...

Charles Boner, Mary Russell Mitford - 1871
...about a month ago, I continued to grow weaker and weaker, and worse and worse. My death was expected from week to week, from day to day, from hour to hour. Mr. May, however, in spite of his immense practice, of my distance from Reading, and of his bad opinion...
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Letters of Mary Russell Mitford: 2d Ser

Mary Russell Mitford - 1872
...cushions, and sometimes have my feet lifted up on another chair. For three months my death was expected from week to week, from day to day, from hour to hour. Then, about six weeks ago, I grew a very little better — that is to say, I did not die, but rather...
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