Justin, Cornelius Nepos, and Eutropius: literally translated, with notes and a general index

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Page 511 - ... oratory in the Tower of London, is still indicated, though with the accents of doubt. Edward IV. came to the throne of England in 1461, at the age of 20. He was one of the handsomest, most luxurious, and most licentious kings of whom history preserves the record. He died in 1483, in the forty-second year of his age and the twenty-third of his reign. He was buried at Windsor, and near to his royal dust was laid the mangled body of the learned, gallant, and brilliant Lord Hastings. Henry Tudor,...
Page 143 - Some time after, as he was going to war with the generals of Alexander, a wild elephant of great bulk presented itself before him of its own accord, and, as...
Page 142 - This man was of humble origin but was stimulated to aspire to regal power by supernatural encouragement; for, having offended Alexander by his boldness of speech and orders being given to kill him, he saved himself by swiftness of foot; and, while he was...
Page 443 - ... fully stated in them that every thing is made clear; and it may be easily concluded that wisdom is in some degree divination, as Cicero not only predicted that those things would happen which took place during his life, but foretold, like a prophet, the things which are coming to pass at present.
Page 528 - ... ordinary, his dining-rooms were set out with the plate of private persons, borrowed from their several houses. By the Gauls* he was not only beloved but venerated, especially because, under his government, they had escaped the suspicious prudence of Diocletian, and the sanguinary rashness of Maximian. He died in Britain, at York, in the thirteenth year of his reign, and was enrolled among the gods. II. Galerius, a man of excellent moral character, and skilful in military affairs, finding that...
Page 121 - ... hopes and comfort ought poor and inferior people to have in this world, considering what so great a king suffered and underwent, and how he was at last forced to leave all, and could not, with all his care and diligence, protract his life one single hour. I knew him, and was entertained in his service in the flower of his age, and at the height of his prosperity, yet I never saw him free from labor and care.
Page 422 - When he returned, he was made prsetor.f in the two-and-tweutieth year after he had been appointed king; J for, as consuls are elected at Rome, so, at Carthage, two kings are annually chosen, retaining their office for a year. In that post Hannibal conducted himself with the same activity as he had exhibited in war; for he took care, not only that there should be money raised from new taxes, to be paid to the Romans according to the treaty, but that there should be a surplus to be deposited in the...
Page 324 - Nor is there any other celebrated act of his in military affairs recorded, besides the account of this command ; but of his justice, equity, and self-control, there are many instances. Above all, it was through his integrity, when he was joined in command of the common fleet of Greece with Pausanias, under whose leadership Mardonius had been put to flight, that the supreme authority at sea was transferred from the Lacedaemonians to the Athenians ; for before that time the Lacedaemonians had the command...
Page 493 - ... old, as Torquatus Manlius was consul in the six hundred and eighty-ninth year from the foundation of the city, and Corvinus, in honour of whom the wine was to be drawn, did not obtain the Consulate till 723 A.
Page 103 - All rank'd by tens, whole decades when they dine Must want a Trojan slave to pour the wine. But other forces have our hopes o'erthrown, And Troy prevails by armies not her own.

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