Between Two Worlds I, Volume 1

Front Cover
Simon Publications LLC, Jan 1, 2001 - Fiction - 452 pages
6 Reviews
From the Versailles Treaty to the 1929 Crash, Lanny Budd's life includes visits to European capitals, six international conferences, high society's yacht cruises, the rise of Hitler & Mussolini.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
3
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Between Two Worlds (World's End Lanny Budd #2)

User Review  - Myles Harrold - Goodreads

This novel details the events that take place after the first world war, leading up the rize of Nazi's in Germany. The crash of the stock market and it's impact on the main characters as well as the ... Read full review

Review: Between Two Worlds (World's End Lanny Budd #2)

User Review  - Alex Manescu - Goodreads

An enthralling story set in the years between the two World Wars. Part romance novel, part manifesto, this book captures the period in a very honest way. War, love, arts, culture, wealth, and poverty--this book has it all. Highly recommended. Read full review

Contents

Peace Be Within Thy Walls
3
Kennst Du das Land?
21
Dou ble Dou ble Toil and Trou ble
41
A Young Mans Fancy
61
Weep for the Worlds Wrong
80
3OOK TWO SOMEONE WHOM I COULD COURT
101
A Sweet Unrest
103
Sweet Sweet O Pan
123
The BestLaid Schemes
226
The Worlds Mine Oyster
248
Blood of the Martyrs
268
Roman Holiday
291
BOOK FOUR MONEY GROWS ON TREES
317
Con tend for Homer Dead
319
Merchants of Beauty
341
Into This Wild Abyss
361

With No Great Change of Manner
145
Con sider the Lilies
161
From Precedent to Pre ce dent
182
BOOK THREE THE STAIRCASE OF HISTORY
203
Woe to the Con quered
205
Broad is the Way
377
RomaBeata
395
The Course of True Love
420
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2001)

Sinclair, a lifelong vigorous socialist, first became well known with a powerful muckraking novel, The Jungle, in 1906. Refused by five publishers and finally published by Sinclair himself, it became an immediate bestseller, and inspired a government investigation of the Chicago stockyards, which led to much reform. In 1967 he was invited by President Lyndon Johnson to "witness the signing of the Wholesome Meat Act, which will gradually plug loopholes left by the first Federal meat inspection law" (N.Y. Times), a law Sinclair had helped to bring about. Newspapers, colleges, schools, churches, and industries have all been the subject of a Sinclair attack, analyzing and exposing their evils. Sinclair was not really a novelist, but a fearless and indefatigable journalist-crusader. All his early books are propaganda for his social reforms. When regular publishers boycotted his work, he published himself, usually at a financial loss. His 80 or so books have been translated into 47 languages, and his sales abroad, especially in the former Soviet Union, have been enormous.

Bibliographic information