The Seven States of California: A Natural and Human History

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University of California Press, 1995 - History - 474 pages
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In The Seven States of California, Philip Fradkin divides California into seven distinct ecological and cultural provinces - from the hot deserts and high peaks that mirror the Southwest and the Rockies to the rain forests, the farmlands that feed a nation, the Maine-like rocky coast, the sandy beaches, and the cold steppes. From each he selects one emblematic feature - a chain of dry lakes, and ocean inlet, an earthquake fault, a river - upon which to hang a series of linked stories about natural objects and human characters as dissimilar as Native Americans and ranchers, missile scientists and dam builders, movie actors and real estate developers.
 

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THE SEVEN STATES OF CALIFORNIA: A Natural and Human History

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

With the light, revealing touch of a master reporter, Fradkin (Wanderings of an Environmental Journalist, 1993, etc.) takes the Golden State's measure, top to bottom. For the author, California is ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - sophiemaroon - LibraryThing

If, like me, you are interested in California, natural history (especially geology), and human history, this is the book for you! He really captures the physical landscape and wonderfully weaves in human histories from a fresh perspective i.e. not what was in your school textbook. Read full review

Contents

The Sierra
63
Land of Fire
113
Land of Water
167
The Great Valley
213
The Fractured Province
269
The Profligate Province
315
Acknowledgments
419
Index
455
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About the author (1995)

Philip Fradkin is the author of six highly acclaimed books on the American West, including the newly updated A River No More (California, 1996). A former environmental writer for the Los Angeles Times, he also served as Assistant Secretary of the California Resources Agency, as Western editor for Audubon magazine, and has taught nonfiction writing at Stanford and UC Berkeley. He shared in a Pulitzer prize awarded to the Los Angeles Times for coverage of the 1965 Watts racial conflict.

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