Victory

Front Cover
Penguin, Nov 1, 1995 - Fiction - 416 pages
2 Reviews
Axel Heyst, a dreamer and a restless drifter, believes he can avoid suffering by cutting himself off from others. Then he becomes involved in the operation of a coal company on a remote island in the Malay Archipelago, and when it fails he turns his back on humanity once more. But his life alters when he rescues a young English girl, Lena, from Zangiacomo's Ladies' Orchestra and the evil innkeeper Schomberg, taking her to his island retreat. The affair between Heyst and Lena begins with her release, but the relationship shifts as Lena struggles to save Heyst from the detachment and isolation that have inhibited and influenced his life.

Marked by a violent and tragic conclusion, Victory is both a tale of rescue and adventure and a perceptive study of a complex relationship and of the power of love.

 

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Review: Victory

User Review  - jerksuke - Goodreads

Good God, it took me two whole weeks to force my way through this book. I was rather excited to read it given the level of praise heaped upon it by other reviewers but alas, no. This book and I were ... Read full review

Contents

I
II
III
IV
V
NOTES TO THE INTRODUCTION
CONRADS LETTERS
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Joseph Conrad (originally Józef Teodor Konrad Nalecz Korzeniowski) was born in the Ukraine in 1857 and grew up under Tsarist autocracy. In 1896 he settled in Kent, where he produced within fifteen years such modern classics as YouthHeart of DarknessLord JimTyphoonNostromoThe Secret Agent and Under Western Eyes. He continued to write until his death in 1924. Today Conrad is generally regarded as one of the greatest writers of fiction in English—his third language.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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