Defining Chu: Image And Reality In Ancient China

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Constance A. Cook, John S. Major
University of Hawaii Press, 2004 - History - 254 pages
Defining Chu begins with an overview of the historical geography, an outline of archaeological evidence for Chu history, and an appreciation of Chu art. Following chapters examine issues of state and society: the ideology of the ruling class, legal procedures, popular culture, and daily life. The final section surveys Chu religion and literature and includes an analysis of the Chuci, the great anthology of Chu poetry, and its impact on mainstream Chinese literature. A translation of the Chu Silk Manuscript¿ is appended. This document has intrigued scholars since its discovery in Changsha some sixty years ago. The inclusion of this rare and difficult text, available for the first time in an effective and accessible translation, will make this volume indispensable to students and scholars of early Chinese history and thought.
 

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Contents

IV
9
V
21
VI
33
VII
49
VIII
51
IX
67
X
77
XI
99
XIII
121
XIV
145
XV
167
XVI
171
XVII
177
XVIII
213
XIX
239
XX
241

XII
119

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About the author (2004)

Cook is associate professor of Chinese language and literature at Lehigh University. Formerly associate professor of history at Dartmouth College and later director of the China Council of The Asia Society.

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