Censorship of the American Theatre in the Twentieth Century

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 26, 2003 - Drama - 332 pages
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John Houchin explores the impact of censorship in twentieth-century American theatre. He argues that theatrical censorship coincides with significant challenges to religious, political and cultural traditions. Along with the well-known instance of the House Un-American Activities Committee in the 1950s, other almost equally influential events shaped the course of the American stage during the century. The book is arranged in chronological order. It provides a summary of censorship in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century America and then analyses key political and theatrical events between 1900 and 2000. These include a discussion of the 1913 riot after the Abbey Theatre touring produdtion of Playboy of the Western World; protests against Clifford Odet's Waiting for Lefty, performed by militant workers during the Depression; and reactions to the recent play Angels in America.
 

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Contents

theatrical censorship from the Puritans
6
Bad girls tough guys and the changing of the guard
40
Flappers and fanatics
72
Have you now or have you ever
117
Bye bye American pie
173
The past is prologue
225
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About the author (2003)

John Houchin is Associate Professor of Theatre at Boston College, Massachusetts. He is the author of The Critical Response to Eugene O'Neill (1993). His work has also been published in The Drama Review, The New England Theatre Journal, The Journal of American Theatre and Drama, Theatre History Studies and the Eugene O'Neill Review.

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