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W. Suttaby, 1806 - Latin poetry - 454 pages
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Page 451 - A youth who hopes th' Olympic prize to gain, All arts must try, and every toil sustain ; Th' extremes of heat and cold must often prove. And shun the weakening joys of wine and love.
Page 453 - Nor say, for trifles why should I displease The man I love? For trifles such as these To serious mischiefs lead the man I love, If once the flatterer's ridicule he prove.
Page 72 - AMONG many parallels which men of imagination have drawn between the natural and moral state of the world, it has been observed that happiness, as well as virtue, consists in mediocrity; that to avoid every extreme is necessary, even to him...
Page 379 - Then cease complaining, friend, and learn to live. He is not poor to whom kind fortune grants, Even with a frugal hand, what Nature wants," he is not poor, he is not in need.
Page 336 - Who then is free ? The wise, who well maintains An empire o'er himself: whom neither chains, Nor want, nor death, with slavish fear inspire; Who boldly answers to his warm desire ; Who can ambition's vainest gifts despise; Firm in himself who on himself relies ; Polish'd and round who runs his proper course, And breaks misfortune with superior force.
Page 296 - One error fools us, though we various stray, Some to the left, and some to t'other side. FRANCIS. It is common among all the classes of mankind, to charge each other with trifling away life: every man looks on the occupation or amusement of his neighbour, as something below the dignity of our nature, and unworthy...
Page 444 - As all might hope to imitate with ease ; Yet while they strive the same success to gain. Should find their labour and their hopes are vain".
Page 450 - Poems like pictures are: some charm when nigh, Others at distance more delight your eye ; That loves the shade, this tempts a stronger light, And challenges the critic's piercing sight: That gives us pleasure for a single view; Aud this, ten times repeated, still is new.
Page 32 - Love and the nymph shall charm my toils, The nymph, who sweetly speaks and sweetly smiles.
Page 448 - Keep Nature's great original in view, And thence the living images pursue. FRANCIS. MY friend Sir Roger de Coverley, when we last met together at the club, told me that he had a great mind to see the new tragedy * with me, assuring me, at the same time, that he had not been at a play these twenty years.

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