The Making of English National Identity

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 13, 2003 - History - 367 pages
Why is English national identity so enigmatic and so elusive? Why, unlike the Scots, Welsh, Irish and most of continental Europe, do the English find it so difficult to say who they are? The Making of English National Identity is a fascinating exploration of Englishness and what it means to be English. Drawing on historical, sociological and literary theory, Krishan Kumar examines the rise of English nationalism and issues of race and ethnicity from earliest times to the present day. He argues that the long history of the English as an imperial people has, as with other imperial people like the Russians and the Austrians, developed a sense of missionary nationalism which in the interests of unity and empire has necessitated the repression of ordinary expressions of nationalism. Professor Kumar's lively and provocative approach challenges readers to reconsider their pre-conceptions about national identity and who the English really are.
 

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Contents

English or British? The question of English national identity
1
Nations and nationalism civic ethnic and imperial
18
When was England?
39
The first English empire?
60
The English nation parent of nationalism?
89
The making of British identity
121
The moment of Englishness
175
The English and the British today
226
Notes
274
List of references
300
Index
353
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About the author (2003)

Krishan Kumar is a distinguished author and Professor of Sociology at the University of Virginia.

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