Pop Goes the Weasel: The Secret Meanings of Nursery Rhymes

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Penguin, Sep 29, 2009 - Literary Criticism - 272 pages
25 Reviews
From the international bestselling author of Red Herrings and White Elephants—a curious guide to the hidden histories of classic nursery rhymes.

Who was Mary Quite Contrary, or Georgie Porgie? How could Hey Diddle Diddle offer an essential astronomy lesson? Do Jack and Jill actually represent the execution of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette? And if Ring Around the Rosie isn’t about the plague, then what is it really about?

This book is a quirky, curious, and sometimes sordid look at the truth behind popular nursery rhymes that uncovers the strange tales that inspired them—from Viking raids to political insurrection to smuggling slaves to freedom.

Read Albert Jack's posts on the Penguin Blog.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jess_reads_books - LibraryThing

The body of a man is found in an abandoned property known to be used by the area’s prostitutes. His body has been ripped open and his heart is missing. The police soon get word that the killer has ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wunderlong88 - LibraryThing

If you are reading nursery rhymes to older children (upper elementary) like I am this is a great companion guide to share with them the background and possible history or meaning behind the rhymes ... Read full review

Contents

Title Page
TRADITIONAL SONGS AND ANTHEMS
Acknowledgements
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Albert Jack’s Red Herrings and White Elephants was a huge international hit and was on the bestsellers list for sixteen months. His second, Shaggy Dogs and Black Sheep was another success: selling over 70,000 copies. He is also the author of That's Bollocks! (all the strangest, sickest, funniest and most unforgettable urban legends as told in Jack's inimitable style) and Albert Jack's Ten-Minute Mysteries.

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