A Psychonaut's Guide to the Invisible Landscape: The Topography of the Psychedelic Experience

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Inner Traditions / Bear & Co, Feb 14, 2006 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 111 pages
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A bold cartography of the inner landscape visible only to those experiencing altered states

• Presents the psychedelic experience as an objective landscape that embodies the Other, rather than a subjective state of mind

• Provides corroboration of phenomena encountered by those who venture into this domain

Journeying into the invisible world revealed by his use of the dissociative psychedelic DXM (dextromethorphan), Dan Carpenter found that what he experienced was not simply subjective sensations and psychological states but an objective world of familiar, if inordinately odd, landmarks and characters. The running diary he kept of these voyages recounts impressions of a landscape charted by other travelers into this Inner Space and includes descriptions of many of the same phenomena recorded by such mind travelers as Terence and Dennis McKenna, Alexander and Ann Shulgin, and others who have experienced the hive mind--the pool of all consciousness. Into this territory where expression is like chaos theory, where oddly symmetrical order manifests out of the seemingly anarchic swirl of images and events, the author ventures with the mind-set of a naturalist, accepting whatever might be rather than what he hopes he might find. What emerges is not a location crafted by subjective experience, but a landscape that embodies the Other and that represents a conscious state in which the barriers between the self and the not-self dissolve.
 

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Contents

Psychedelics and the Wilderness of the Mind
6
Dissociates
12
Trip One
18
Trip Two
19
Trip Three
24
Liquid Technology
26
Breaks in Time
28
Trip Four
30
The Spiral
59
Thought Cakes
62
Trip Seven
63
Fabrics of Families
65
The Machinery Behind
66
The Circus Behind
70
Trip Eight
74
Offers of Power
75

Meeting Myselves
32
Visions of Strife
35
Dream Police
37
Reintegration of the Selves
38
Trip Five
47
NearDeath Experiences
49
Outposts of Reality
50
The Buddhist Guides
51
Reading and Remembering
53
The Dead in the Hive
54
Trip Six
56
The Face of God
57
Trip Nine
77
Trip Ten
79
The Invisible Landscape
85
Room One
86
Machine Elves Solved
87
Trip Eleven
92
Trip Twelve
97
Trip Thirteen
104
Afterthoughts
107
Bibliography
110
Copyright

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Page xiv - I am the LORD, and there is no other. I form the light and create darkness, I bring prosperity and create disaster; I, the LORD, do all these things.
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About the author (2006)

A bold cartography of the inner landscape visible only to those experiencing altered states

• Presents the psychedelic experience as an objective landscape that embodies the Other, rather than a subjective state of mind

• Provides corroboration of phenomena encountered by those who venture into this domain

Journeying into the invisible world revealed by his use of the dissociative psychedelic DXM (dextromethorphan), Dan Carpenter found that what he experienced was not simply subjective sensations and psychological states but an objective world of familiar, if inordinately odd, landmarks and characters. The running diary he kept of these voyages recounts impressions of a landscape charted by other travelers into this Inner Space and includes descriptions of many of the same phenomena recorded by such mind travelers as Terence and Dennis McKenna, Alexander and Ann Shulgin, and others who have experienced the hive mind--the pool of all consciousness. Into this territory where expression is like chaos theory, where oddly symmetrical order manifests out of the seemingly anarchic swirl of images and events, the author ventures with the mind-set of a naturalist, accepting whatever might be rather than what he hopes he might find. What emerges is not a location crafted by subjective experience, but a landscape that embodies the Other and that represents a conscious state in which the barriers between the self and the not-self dissolve.

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