A History of the Hemp Industry in Kentucky

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University Press of Kentucky, 1951 - History - 240 pages
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Contents

THE HEMP FARM
13
MANAGEMENT AND SALE OF THE CROP
39
PRICES AND PRODUCTION TO 1861
69
MANUFACTURING TO 1861
113
PRODUCTION OF HEMP FOR MARINE USE
152
THE DECLINE OF THE INDUSTRY
194
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
221
UPDATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
231
INDEX
236
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Page 225 - A practical treatise on the culture of hemp for seed and fiber, with a sketch of the history and nature of the hemp plant.
Page 27 - A wealthy Kentucky farmer has 20 or 30 slaves, whom he treats rather like children than servants, — 2 or 3000 acres of land, 500 acres of which are cleared and in cultivation. He lives in a bad house, keeps a plentiful table, which is covered three times a day with a great many dishes. Brandy, Whisky, and Rum are always standing at a side table. He is hospitable, but rather ostentatious, plain in his manners, and rather grave; a great politician, rather apt to censure than to praise, and a rather...
Page 28 - I was deeply convinced on my last visit in 1845 to the same neighborhood, when so much of the forest had been destroyed as to bring places, which fifty-five years before had seemed quite remote, into full view of each other, and make them seem quite near. It is a remarkable fact that in the early period of which I am writing, from 1794 to 1800, the white population was greater in that neighborhood than I found it in the visit referred to. In a single solitary walk of two miles, which included the...
Page 29 - ... so impressively shown forth by what I have said, has occurred in various parts of Kentucky, and must be referred to the influence of Slavery. As bodies of different specific gravity rise to the surface in different times, so in every community some will rise in the world more rapidly than others In a Slave state, new investments are constantly made in land and negroes, and hence the soil is constantly passing from the many to the few ; slaves take the place of freemen, "negro quarters...

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