The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, for the Year ..., Volume 163

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Edw. Cave, 1736-[1868], 1838 - Literature
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Page 522 - ... such signature shall be made or acknowledged by the testator in the presence of two or more witnesses present at the same time, and such witnesses shall attest and shall subscribe the will in the presence of the testator, but no form of attestation shall be necessary.
Page 14 - And sullen Moloch, fled, Hath left in shadows dread His burning idol, all of blackest hue ; In vain with cymbals' ring They call the grisly king, In dismal dance about the furnace blue.
Page 167 - Their blood is shed In confirmation of the noblest claim, Our claim to feed upon immortal truth, To walk with God, to be divinely free, To soar, and to anticipate the skies.
Page 167 - And chased them up to Heaven. Their ashes flew — No marble tells us whither^ With their names No bard embalms and sanctifies his song : And history, so warm on meaner themes, Is cold on this.
Page 126 - ... How sleep the brave, who sink to rest By all their country's wishes blest! When Spring, with dewy fingers cold, Returns to deck their hallowed mould, She there shall dress a sweeter sod Than Fancy's feet have ever trod. By fairy hands their knell is rung; By forms unseen their dirge is sung; There Honour comes, a pilgrim grey, To bless the turf that wraps their clay; And Freedom shall awhile repair To dwell, a weeping hermit, there!
Page 469 - ... dignity, to a diminutive and shadowy stem. Who shall describe his countenance — catch its quivering sweetness — and fix it for ever in words ? There are none, alas ! to answer the vain desire of friendship. Deep thought, striving with humour : the lines of suffering wreathed into cordial mirth ; and a smile of painful sweetness, present an image to the mind it can as little describe as lose. His personal appearance and manner are not unfitly characterised by what he himself says in one of...
Page 168 - And his feet like unto fine brass, as if they burned in a furnace ; and his voice as the sound of many waters ; and his countenance was as the sun shineth in his strength.
Page 469 - ... overthrow it, clad in clerklike black, was surmounted by a head of form and expression the most noble and sweet. His black hair curled crisply about an expanded forehead; his eyes, softly brown, twinkled with varying expression, though the prevalent feeling was sad; and the nose slightly curved, and delicately carved at the nostril, with the lower outline of the face regularly oval, completed a head which was finely placed on the shoulders, and gave importance, and even dignity, to a diminutive...
Page 462 - Dyers, (you may know them by their gait,) lamps lit at night, pastrycooks' and silversmiths' shops, beautiful Quakers of Pentonville, noise of coaches, drowsy cry of mechanic watchmen at night, with bucks reeling home drunk; if you happen to wake at midnight, cries of " Fire !" and " Stop thief !" inns of court, with their learned air, and halls, and butteries, just like Cambridge colleges; old book-stalls, "Jeremy Taylors," " Burtons on Melancholy," and " Religio Medicis,
Page 523 - And be it further enacted, that every will shall be construed, with reference to the real estate and personal estate comprised in it, to speak and take effect as if it had been executed immediately before the death of the testator, unless a contrary intention shall appear by the will.

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