The Development of a Residential Qualification for Representatives in Colonial Legislatures

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author, 1921 - Legislative bodies - 257 pages
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Page 201 - Individuals, of and with the Advice, Assent, and Approbation of the Free-Men of the said Province, or of the greater Part of them, or of their Delegates or Deputies...
Page 60 - Every member of the house of representatives shall be chosen by written votes ; and, for one year at least next preceding...
Page 169 - ... with the advice, assent, and approbation of the freemen of the said country, or the greater part of them, or of their delegates or deputies...
Page 184 - All freemen, above twenty-one years of age, having a freehold of fifty acres of land, in the county in which they offer to vote, and residing therein — and all freemen, having property in this state above the value of thirty pounds current money, and having resided in the county, in which they offer to vote, one whole year next preceding the election, shall have a right of suffrage, in the election of Delegates for such county...
Page 60 - ... shall be at the time of his election an inhabitant of the town, parish or place he may be chosen to represent ; shall be of the protestant religion, and shall cease to represent such town, parish or place immediately on his ceasing to be qualified as aforesaid.
Page 139 - Assembly so to be called, do consist of four and Twenty Representatives ; who are to be chosen in the manner following, viz.
Page 158 - Grievances, and shall have all other Powers and Privileges of an Assembly, according to the Rights of the Freeborn Subjects of England, and as is usual in any of the King's Plantations in America.
Page 20 - To the end the body of the commons may be preserved of honest and good men, it was ordered and agreed, that, for the time to come, no man shall be admitted to the freedom of this body politic, but such as are members of some of .the churches within the limits of the same.
Page 187 - That the planters might have a hande in the governing of themselves, yt was graunted that a generall assemblie shoulde be helde yearly once, whereat were to be present the governor and counsell with two burgesses from each plantation, freely to be elected by the inhabitantes thereof, this assemblie to have power to make and ordaine whatsoever lawes and orders should by them be thought good and profitable for their subsistence.
Page 190 - Council shall be called THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, wherein (as also in the said Council of State) all Matters shall be decided, determined, and ordered, by the greater Part of the Voices then present ; reserving to the Governor always a Negative Voice.

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