The Theory of Morals

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C. Scribner's sons, 1883 - Ethics - 490 pages
 

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Page 15 - Of two pleasures, if there be one to which all or almost all who have experience of both give a decided preference, irrespective of any feeling of moral obligation to prefer it, that is the more desirable pleasure. If one of the two is, by those who are competently acquainted with both, placed so far above the other that they prefer it, even though knowing it to be attended with a greater amount of discontent, and would not resign it for any quantity of the other pleasure which their nature is capable...
Page 46 - Questions of ultimate ends are not amenable to direct proof. Whatever can be proved to be good, must be so by being shown to be a means to something admitted to be good without proof. The medical art is proved to be good by its conducing to health ; but how is it possible to prove that health is good? The art of music is good, for the reason, among others, that it produces pleasure ; but what proof is it possible to give that pleasure is good?
Page 33 - There is a way which seemeth right unto a man, but the end thereof are the ways of death.
Page 96 - Where there is neither Greek nor Jew, circumcision nor uncircumcision, Barbarian, Scythian, bond nor free : but CHRIST is all, and in all.
Page 320 - a generous action: in so free and kind a manner did they contribute to " my relief, that if I was dry, I drank the sweetest draught; and if hungry, " I ate the coarsest morsel with a double relish.
Page 322 - Abdulkader, answer me this question. If the chance of war had placed me in your situation, and you in mine, how would you have treated me?" "I would have thrust my spear into your heart," returned Abdulkader, with great firmness; "and I know that a similar fate awaits me.
Page 323 - ... indeed red with the blood of your subjects killed in battle, and I could now give it a deeper stain, by dipping it in your own; but this would not build up my towns, nor bring to life the thousands who fell in the woods. I will not, therefore, kill you in cold blood, but I will retain you as my slave, until I perceive that your presence in your own kingdom will be no longer dangerous to your neighbors, and then I will consider of the proper way of disposing of you.
Page 404 - For that which I do I allow not: for what I would, that do I not; but what I hate, that do I.
Page 154 - Act so that you treat humanity, whether in your own person or in that of another, always as an end and never as a means only
Page 320 - I never addressed myself in the language of decency and friendship, without receiving a decent and friendly answer; with man it has often been otherwise.

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