The Yoga-darśana: The Sutras of Patañjali with the Bhāsya of Vyasa

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Rajaram Tukaram Tatya, 1907 - Yoga - 161 pages
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Page 94 - ... into contact with other objects and become submerged in the citta, also cease along with it. Dharana is the concentration of citta on a particular place, which is so very necessary at the time of pranayamas mentioned before. The mind may thus be held steadfast in such places as the sphere of the navel, the lotus of the heart, the light in the brain, the forepart of the nose, the forepart of the tongue, and such like parts of the body. Dhyana is the continuance or changing flow of the mental effort...
Page 12 - Right notions are perception, inference, and testimony. Misconception is incorrect notion, or a notion which abides in a form which is not that of its object. Fancy is a notion founded on knowledge conveyed by words, but of which there is no object corresponding in reality. Sleep is that function of the thinking principle which has far its object the conception of nothing.
Page iii - ... directly apprehend •the object on which he is meditating — for instance, some form of personal divinity. In Abstract Communion, on the other hand, there •is a complete inhibition of all the functions of the mind, wherein the agent loses all consciousness of things outside himself ; he is literally self-conscious, not indeed conscious of his self as apart from other selves, but of the Self, and that alone as One, Absolute, Eternal, Unchanging. The effect of the former is visible or perceptible,...
Page xii - Abstraction, consists in the withdrawal of the mind and the sense-organs from their respective objects. These five have been regarded as "external" factors, exercising a more or less exterior influence, dealing as they do with the controlling of the body, breathing and the senses. The next three have been called "internal", as exercising an inner influence, and hence of greater importance, bearing upon the mind directly.
Page 63 - There is hardly any one thing which is not made of these three qualities, as obviously there is nothing which is free from being the source of pleasure, pain and delusion to different parties, and ( at times ) by turns to the same party.
Page 153 - Vacaspati, in his commentary, writes: The Spirit's apprehension of its own cognition comes about when the mind takes its form, ie, when the mind becomes the substratum of the reflection of the Spirit, and as such takes its form. As, for example, even without any action of the moon, the clear rippling water reflecting the disc of the moon, manifests the moon also as moving; in the same manner, even without any action of the Spirit itself, the mind reflecting the Spirit makes the Spirit appear as being...
Page 157 - III. When after this illumination the Yogin works entirely without attachment to any object or desire, he reaches the state of supreme non-attachment wherein the light of the soul breaks out in full.
Page 143 - This is added in order to meet the following objection : " How can there be any permanent conglomeration of the cause with the effect? Or again, how...
Page ii - Communion, the object meditated upon is distinctly and directly apprehended; that is to say, in this meditation the inhibition of the mind enables the agent to directly apprehend •the object on which he is meditating — for instance, some form of personal divinity. In Abstract Communion, on the other hand, there •is a complete inhibition of all the functions of the mind, wherein the agent loses all consciousness of things outside himself ; he is literally self-conscious, not indeed conscious...
Page 163 - Gheranda Samhita, being a Treatise on the Hatha and Raja Yogas, printed with Sanskrit Text and an Appendix containing extracts from English works of authority, describing the Samadhi taken by the Sadhu Haridas at the Court of lianjitsingha in Panjab 0 8 8.

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