The Sháhnáma of Firdausí

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Psychology Press, Jul 27, 2001 - Social Science - 464 pages
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The legendary Greek figure Orpheus was said to have possessed magical powers capable of moving all living and inanimate things through the sound of his lyre and voice. Over time, the Orphic theme has come to indicate the power of music to unsettle, subvert, and ultimately bring down oppressive realities in order to liberate the soul and expand human life without limits. The liberating effect of music has been a particularly important theme in twentieth-century African American literature.

The nine original essays in Black Orpheus examines the Orphic theme in the fiction of such African American writers as Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, James Baldwin, Nathaniel Mackey, Sherley Anne Williams, Ann Petry, Ntozake Shange, Alice Walker, Gayl Jones, and Toni Morrison. The authors discussed in this volume depict music as a mystical, shamanistic, and spiritual power that can miraculously transform the realities of the soul and of the world. Here, the musician uses his or her music as a weapon to shield and protect his or her spirituality. Written by scholars of English, music, women's studies, American studies, cultural theory, and black and Africana studies, the essays in this interdisciplinary collection ultimately explore the thematic, linguistic structural presence of music in twentieth-century African American fiction.

 

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The Kandake (Candace) of the Pseudo-Callisthenes and of the Syriac version becomes Kaidafa in Firdausi, which shows that his account came to him through the Arabic, in which the name, in the absence of diacritical points, could be read either way. Similarly the Kandaules of the Greek, the Kandaros of the syriac, became Kaidrush, the story having passed from Greek into Pahlavi, from Pahlavi into Syriac, from Syriac into Arabic, and from Arabic into Persian again (modern instead of middle) before Firdausi dealt with it. (P.66) In Firdausi the pair are taken prisoners by Sikandar while celebrating their wedding-feast in the city of king Faryan, the father of the bride. P.66 

Contents

GENEALOG1cAL TABLE OF THE SAHAN1ANS
3
ABDSH1K PAPAKA N continued
6
S1KA NDAR continual
12
How Danib built the City of Uisrdbgird
20
SlKANDAB continued
23
DARA SON OF DARAB
27
SlKANDAB
85
ABDSH1B
258
_ SON
301
BAHRAM SON OF URMOZD
307
BAHRAM BAHRAM1YAN
313
ABDBB1B BROTHER OF SHAIUK
363
8XCT PAGX
368
YAZDAG1RD SON OF SHAPUR
374
IJVDEX
413
Copyright

SHAPfiR SON Of ABDSHfR
295

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