Global Electronic Commerce: A Policy Primer

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Peterson Institute, 2000 - Business & Economics - 213 pages
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Electronic commerce is changing the ways that businesses & consumers interact with each other, the products they create, buy & sell, & the way that they communicate, learn & become informed. How can policymakers position their countries & themselves to take advantage of this new environment? How should policymaking adjust to a more global, more networked & more information-rich marketplace where relationships & jurisdictions between the governments, businesses & citizens of different countries increasingly overlap? How can governments effectively harness rapidly changing technologies & partner with both domestic & foreign private sectors to reap the greatest benefits for their constituents? This primer answers these questions using both general analysis & specific examples. It addresses in particular the needs of policymakers in emerging markets who must formulate & refine policies that affect e-commerce in areas such as telecommunications & finance, international trade & domestic distribution & taxation & privacy. Companies considering doing business in these economies also will find that the examples of the issues that policymakers face, the different policy approaches that they choose & the market opportunities that arise as more & more economies around the world embrace global electronic commerce. July 2000. 230 pages. ISBN: paper 0-88132-274-1. $20.00. ". . . an impressive & comprehensive book on a complex subject . . . (It) will have use far beyond the developing countries for which it is primarily targeted." -Andrew Wyckoff, head of the Economic Analysis & Statistics Division, Directorate of Science, OECD.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Overview
9
Boxes
10
Internet Economics and the Economics of the Internet
21
Communications Systems
47
Financial Sector and Payment Systems
57
Distribution and Delivery
69
Opportunities and Challenges for Government and Policy
77
2 The DoubleClick imbroglio and information gathering
124
5 Changing US environment and emerging trends
130
The US approach
139
Government in the International Arena
143
1 United Nationsrelated organizations dealing with electronic
146
3 OECD research and activities
154
4 Whats in a name? Cybersquatting and intellectual property
163
7 Governmentendorsed principles to support electronic
170

The Gilmore Commission
85
A Residence
95
4 The agreement on government procurement under the
101
Government and the Environment of Certainty and Trust
103
1 us encryption policy
110
The Digital Divide
173
Conclusions and Recommendations
189
References
195
2 The growing importance of Internet telephony 54
205
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About the author (2000)

Catherine Mann was a senior fellow who is now the Chief Economist at the OECD, where she also heads up the Economics Directorate. She was most recently the Barbara '54 and Richard M. Rosenberg Professor of Global Finance at the International Business School, Brandeis University, where she also directed the Rosenberg Institute of Global Finance. She joins the OECD after 7 years at Brandeis and following 20-plus years in Washington, DC.

Sue E. Eckert served as assistant secretary of export administration in the Clinton Administration. At the Watson Institute, she co-directs the projects on Targeted Sanctions and Terrorist Financing and explores cybersecurity governance issues. Eckert and colleague Thomas Biersteker lead an international research consortium and database (Targeted Sanctions Consortium) of more than 50 scholars and practitioners located at institutions around the world examining the impacts and effectiveness of United Nations targeted sanctions. She works extensively with UN bodies to enhance instruments of collective security, having co-authored Targeted Financial Sanctions: A Manual for Design and Implementation, participated in the series of multilateral initiatives (the Interlaken, Bonn-Berlin, and Stockholm Processes), and organized workshops, simulations, and training for the Security Council and related groups.

Sarah Cleeland Knight is an assistant professor of international politics at American University's School of International Service.

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