The Periodical Cicada

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U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology, 1907 - Cicada (Genus) - 181 pages
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Page 4 - Suggestions as to work recommended for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1908, for use in preparing estimates.
Page 53 - Delaware, Dubois, Elkhart, Fayette, Floyd, Fountain, Franklin, Fulton, Gibson, Grant, Greene, Hamilton, Hancock, Harrison, Hendricks, Henry, Howard, Huntington, Jackson, Jasper, Jay, Jefferson, Jennings, Johnson, Knox, Kosciusko, Lagrange, Lake...
Page 152 - It hould be applied in two or three holes about the, tree to a depth of 6 to 12 inches and not closer than one and one-half feet to the crown. An ounce of the chemical should be introduced into each hole, which should be immediately closed. The bisulphide evaporates and penetrates throughout the soil, and readily and promptly kills the aphides. It does not, however, furnish any protection from future attacks, and is attended with danger to the tree unless the precautions named are carefully observed.
Page 153 - It is to be observed, that the spring before this sickness, there was a numerous company of flies, which were like for bigness unto wasps or bumblebees ; they came out of little holes in the ground, and did eat up the green things, and made such a constant yelling noise as made the woods ring of them, and ready to deafen the hearers...
Page 153 - The third strange appearance was swarms of flies about an inch long, and big as the top of a man's little finger, rising out of the spigot holes in the earth, which eat the new-sprouted leaves from the tops of the trees...
Page 101 - The time required in the transformation varies, and, though for the splitting of the skin and the full stretching of the wings in the flat position the time is usually about twenty minutes, it may be, under precisely similar conditions, five or six times as long. But there are few more beautiful sights than to see this...
Page 146 - The insects attacked by it become sluggish and averse to flight, co that they can easily be taken by hand. After a time some of the posterior rings of the abdomen fall away, revealing the fungus within. Strange as it may seem, the insect may, and sometimes does, live for a time in this condition. Though it is not killed at once, it is manifestly incapacitated for propagation, and therefore the fungus may be said to prevent to some extent the injury that would otherwise be done to the trees by these...
Page 154 - ... 1751. The account of his travels, published in Stockholm between 1753 and 1761, contains much interesting information relative to the common insects of this country at that early period, and gives a brief statement of the habits of the periodical Cicada. While this work was being printed, Professor Kalm published a more detailed account of the species in the Swedish Transactions for 1756 (pp. 101-116). The account given in his travels (English edition, 1771, Vol. II, p. 6), is as follows : There...
Page 108 - He also states that when the cicadas first leave the earth they are plump and full of oily juices; so much so that they are employed in making soap. Mr. John Bartram, writing of the brood which appeared near Philadelphia in 1749, and referring to the pupae as they appeared near the surface of the ground toward the end of April, says that they were then full of a thick white matter like cream and that hogs rooted up the ground a foot deep in search of them. Dr. Potter refers briefly to the fact that...
Page 100 - To witness these pupae in such vast numbers that one cannot step on the ground without crushing several, swarming out of their subterranean holes and scrambling over the ground, all converging to the one central point, and then in a steady stream...

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